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Tag Archives: KESAS

Anatomy of an Adrenaline Rush

Adrenaline Rush De Wallen Industry

Illustration courtesy of De Wallen Industry

Cycling is a safe activity, posing little risk either to cyclists themselves or to other road users.  The degree of risk assumed by cyclists depends on a variety of factors:  where they are riding, the condition of the road surface, the speed they are riding (especially on descents), the condition of their bikes, how visible they are at night, and so on.

Kuala Lumpur is a relatively safe place to cycle, even in the city center.

Safe Urban

Illustration courtesy of Lucas Varela (FT Magazine)

Accidents involving cyclists do happen though.  Sometimes fatal ones.  So my friends and I do what we can to stay away from dangerous situations.  They cannot be avoided entirely however, for example when crossing junctions.  With proper care, those can be negotiated safely.

Nevertheless, there is one place along a popular route where the risk level rises significantly.  This is before and after the Persiaran Kewajipan intersection on the KESAS highway from Kota Kemuning toward Subang Jaya.  There are in fact three danger points to be negotiated during that 2km /  1.2mi stretch.  There is no motorcycle lane along that stretch, so cyclists have to ride on the highway.

KESAS Kewajipan Map

Map courtesy of Google

The first danger point comes 400 meters / 1,300 feet after the motorcycle lane ends, and we are spat out onto the highway.

A lane of traffic filters down onto the highway from the left.  We cyclists have to hold our line while watching for vehicles cutting across from left to right.  At this point we are already riding in the middle of the highway, with three lanes to our left, and three lanes to our right.

KESAS Kewajipan 1

Map courtesy of Google

The second danger point immediately follows.  We have to switch our attention to our right.  We must watch for traffic merging from the right and moving into the three exit lanes on our left.  That is the most adrenaline-inducing section, because the traffic approaching from behind and to our right is travelling at highway speeds.  The speed limit there is 90kph / 65mph, but some vehicles are moving faster.

Our strategy is to ride together as one group, in double-file, and as fast as we can, along that section.  Fortunately it is slightly downhill, and we can spin up to about 60kph / 37mph.  The adrenaline rush helps as well!

KESAS Kewajipan 2

Map courtesy of Google

We then get a rest as the highway separates from the off-ramp, and we can roll along the road shoulder under the Persiaran Kewajipan overpass.  The shoulder is wide, and we can ride a few yards to the left of traffic.

We have about 500 meters / 1,600 feet to catch our breath.  Then we have to cross the two lanes of traffic coming from the left down the ramp from Persiaran Kewajipan onto KESAS.

There is about 200 meters / 660 feet for us to get over to the far left and back onto the safety of the motorcycle lane.

KESAS Kewajipan 3

Map courtesy of Google

It is an unavoidable gauntlet for anyone riding from the west of Bandar Sunway towards Bukit Jalil.  We have ridden that section many times, and have, so far, been lucky.  No near misses.

I have ridden that section alone.  Which raises the adrenaline level even more.  I make sure that I am as visible as possible.  Bright clothes, flashing lights, and an arm waving in the air.  I also make sure that I get there before dark.  Riding that section of KESAS at night would really be tempting fate.

We seal our fate

The Art of Exercise

I enjoy studying graphic representations of data.  Like this map illustrating 59,036 routes between 3,209 airports on 531 airlines spanning the globe.

Sisu openflights org

Graphic courtesy of openflights.org

And this chart showing our galaxy’s relative size and position within the known universe.

Sisu Galaxy national geographic com

Graphic courtesy of nationalgeographic.com

The latest graphic to pique my interest is one created by Sisu.

Sisu Logo

Sisu takes your exercise data from Strava or Runkeeper, and turns that data into a print.  Sisu has been around since at least 2014.  Co-founder Peter Roome posted the first blog entry on the Sisu website in May that year.

I found out about Sisu last week, when cycling friends started posting their Sisu prints on Facebook.

There are a few designs to choose from on the Sisu website.  I like their original design that displays all the routes you covered between your chosen start and finish dates.  The plots of each route are sized so all of them fit on one page.  Thus the plots are not to scale.

Below are the routes I rode in 2010, the year I started cycling.  The first four rows show rides within and around Houston, Texas.  The rest of the routes are either loops or out-and-back rides starting from Den Haag, The Netherlands.  I moved from Houston to Den Haag in May 2010.

The rides range from 14.5km / 9mi (row two, far right, which was a short run from my Houston home to Hermann Park and back), to 124.5km / 77mi (row six, third from the left, which was from my Den Haag home to Kinderdijk and back).

Sisu 2010

Graphic courtesy of madewithsisu.com

Even with only fifty rides in 2010, patterns emerge from the plots.  Most of my Houston rides were with the West End 6:30 group.  We rode a consistent route through the city every Tuesday and Thursday.  Most of those are shown on row three.

Den Haag is just a couple of kilometers from the coast.  You can’t ride very far west before you run into the North Sea.  So a lot of my rides in The Netherlands followed the coastline, either south-west or north- east from Den Haag.

As you lengthen the timeline, the Sisu plots of each route get smaller.  To ensure that, in this case, 885 routes fit on one page.

This print shows my entire Strava ride history.

Sisu 2010 to 170318

Graphic courtesy of madewithsisu.com

I think this print is a fascinating way to review my cycling history.  It is obvious from the graphic that my Kuala Lumpur friends and I spent an awful lot of time on the KESAS Highway in 2013 and 2014, as shown by all the horizontal, slightly squiggly routes in the middle third of the print.

There was a time when the Bukit Damansara route was popular.  This route Bukit Damansaraappears a dozen times in the centre rows.

Highlights stand out too.

An evening’s ride around the Sepang International Circuit produced this plot Sisu Sepang.  It is not too difficult to find, about two-thirds of the way down the print.

More difficult to pick out is this route, my longest ever ride at 445km / 276.5mi Sisu BRM400.  It is in the fourth row from the bottom.

Of course, what my Facebook friends and I should be doing is paying Sisu for a print.

Sisu Order

Prints come on 300 grams per square meter Matt Photorag stock.  300gsm paper stock is at the higher end of paper thickness.

The print size is 12 inches by 16 inches for US orders, and A3 size (297mm by 420mm) for orders from the rest of the world.  The price for a physical print, or a digital download, are above.

I’m thinking of a present to myself when I hit 60,112km / 37,351mi.  That is 1.5 times around the circumference of the Earth.  Which should be in two months or so.

The Tandem Men

the-tandem-men-logo

Logo courtesy of thetandemmen.com

Three months ago a former colleague of mine asked if he could connect me with two guys who are attempting to be the first pair to circumnavigate the globe on a tandem bicycle.  A ride that would take them through thirty countries.

the-tandem-men-jersey

Photograph courtesy of thetandemmen.com

Andy told me that at the time, the guys were cycling between Istanbul, Turkey and Tbilisi, Georgia.  Their route from Thailand to Singapore would bring them through Kuala Lumpur.

I replied “I would love to meet up with your friends when they come through KL.”

It then went quiet until last Monday, when I received a WhatsApp message from George Agate, one of The Tandem Men.  John Whybrow and he had just crossed the border between Thailand and Malaysia, and were on their way to Georgetown.

That’s when I opened up their website, The Tandem Men, and checked their route through Malaysia.  John and George has started their 29,000km / 18,000mi journey from Canterbury, England in June.  Since then they pedalled through France, Belgium, The Netherlands, Germany, The Czech Republic, Slovakia, Austria, Hungary, Romania, Bulgaria, Turkey (arriving there on the day of the attempted coup d’état), and ending the European leg  of their round-the-world trip in Georgia (due to a detour after not being able to get visas to enter Iran).

They then flew from Tbilisi to Mumbai, India, to start the Asian sector.  From Mumbai they cycled down the west coast of the sub-continent to Nagercoil, before heading northeast to Chennai.  A flight across the Bay of Bengal took them to Bangkok, their first stop in South-East Asia.  Now they were almost on my doorstep.

the-tandem-men-route

Map courtesy of thetandemmen.com

My initial reply to George was to welcome them to Malaysia, and to suggest an alternate route for them to follow from Georgetown to Kuala Lumpur.  The route on their website was via the North-South Expressway.  This would not work because bicycles are not allowed on the North-South Expressway.  Never mind that the volume and high speed of the traffic on that highway make it a dangerous place for cyclists to be.

I suggested that they use the coastal roads through Seri Manjung and Kuala Selangor instead.  Further to pedal, but more scenic, and with less traffic to contend with.  That route would also allow my friends and I to meet them in Bandar Botanic, and to ride with them along the KESAS and MEX highways into KL.

I also offered to host them while they were in KL, and I was delighted that they took me up on my offer.

George and John did follow the coastal route, spending nights at Seri Manjung and Kuala Selangor on Tuesday and Wednesday respectively.  On Thursday morning, Lay, Marco and I rode to Bandar Botanic, where  I had suggested we meet.

The three of us got to Bandar Botanic a bit early.  We parked ourselves at Restoran Resepi Warisan for nasi lemak, teh tarik and iced coffee.  The restaurant was a couple of hundred meters from the point on Jalan Langat where I had suggested we meet.

I sent The Tandem Men our location via WhatsApp.  A few minutes later John and George rolled up to the restaurant.

the-tandem-men-02

Photograph courtesy of Marco Lai

Fantastic!

We got another round of drinks before heading to the motorcycle lane along the KESAS highway.

One of the many rules rules stipulated by Guinness World Records is that George and John are not allowed to draft.  So the tandem bike led the way, complete with its 35 kilo / 77 pound complement of panniers, bags and water bottles.

the-tandem-men-10

Photograph courtesy of Marco Lai

Taking KESAS to get into KL from the west was certainly a better option than coming in from the north via Jalan Kuching.  Not having to share the road with cars, vans and lorries is a definite plus.

Being separated from other traffic does not prevent punctures though.  George and John noticed that they had a slow leak as we neared the Kinrara R & R.  The rear tire leak was slow enough, and we were close enough to home, that we decided to take the risk of pumping it up and continuing on our way, rather than changing the inner tube.

We exited the KESAS highway at Awan Kecil and took the MEX highway to Jalan Tun Razak.

the-tandem-men-06

Photograph courtesy of Marco Lai

One kilometer to go.

the-tandem-men-04

Photograph courtesy of Marco Lai

John and George graciously agreed to go to Le’Park@Nasi Lemak Malaya for dinner, and to share stories with some of my cycling friends.

the-tandem-men-03

Photograph courtesy of Danial Marzuki

The Tandem Men have so far covered 10,651km / 6,618mi over 114 days.  About one third of the distance required to become the first people to circumnavigate the world by tandem bicycle.

One of their personal goals is obviously to complete this adventure of a lifetime.  Another is to raise at least £100,000 / RM537,000 / USD130,000 for the three brilliant causes that they have chosen to support on their journey.  The work of these charities changes the lives for many, both locally and internationally. These charities are:

  • Porchlight (which will receive 34%)
  • Great Ormond Street Hospital (which will receive 33%), and
  • WaterAid (which will receive 33%)

If you would like to donate to these charities, please click the link below.

DONATE

It has been a treat and an honour to meet and host George and John.  My friends and I will be following their progress as they cross Australia, ride up through New Zealand, make their way from San Francisco to Panama, and finally ride from Marrakech up through southern Europe and back to Canterbury in England.

Godspeed, and fair winds George and John.

the-tandem-men-12

Photograph courtesy of thetandemmen.com

BCG Morib Ride

 

The Bangsar Cycling Group can be counted on to organise fun rides.  The latest one I did with them was a run from Kota Kemuning to Morib.  Just shy of 100km / 62mi there and back.

BCG Morib Ride Route

Map courtesy of Ride With GPS

14 of us left the McDonald’s Kota Kemuning car park just after 7.00am.  Unfortunately one cyclist suffered a broken spoke 5km / 3mi into the ride, so she and her partner had to turn around.

The rest of us continued along the motorcycle lane beside the KESAS Highway, keeping our ears open for the sound of approaching Hondas, Yamahas and Suzukis.  Unfortunately we cyclists don’t get the motorcycle lane to ourselves, even on a Sunday.

It wasn’t long before we on Jalan Klang Banting, sharing the road with all manner of motorised vehicles.  I for one was thankful that there seemed to be less traffic than usual on Jalan Klang Banting for a Sunday.  Despite how it looks in this photograph.

BCG Morib Ride Banting 02 Johan S

Photograph courtesy of Johan Sopiee

We spent about 10km / 6mi on Jalan Klang Lama before we turned off that major road onto Jalan Bandar Long and then Jalan Pusara.  Both are much quieter secondary roads, or what we would call kampung roads.

One of the goals of this ride was to maintain a pace that everyone was comfortable with, and which allowed people to practice riding in a pack.  Always with the option to make a stop or two to ensure that the group stays together.

Once the group was on the really quiet coastal road between Pantai Kelanang and Morib, Foogie and I ran an experiment.  We wanted to find out what speed was just that bit too fast for people to hold a conversation whilst they were riding.  We put ourselves at the front of the peloton, reduced our speed until there was lots of chatter behind us, and then slowly ramped things up.  It got very quiet behind us at about 28kph / 17mph.

In just under two hours from the time we left Kota Kemuning we were all seated at the Medan Selera (Food Court) at Morib Beach, waiting for our drinks and ais kacang.

BCG Morib Ride Makan AiLin Lim

Photograph courtesy of AiLin Lim

After we were well-irrigated, we posed for the de rigueur seaside shots.

BCG Morib Ride at Morib

Photograph courtesy of Wee Hwee Wang

BCG Morib Ride at Morib Safwan Siddiq

Photograph courtesy of Safwan Siddiq

Photo session over, we retraced our route back to Kota Kemuning.  There was talk of making a short detour to Jugra.  There is a lookout point with an impressive view of the Langat River, and the Straits of Malacca beyond, at Bukit Jugra, but it is a very steep climb to get to it.  We turned right, away from the climb.  Maybe next time.

BCG Morib Ride Jugra Johan S

Photograph courtesy of Johan Sopiee

Instead, a few kilometers further on we stopped at a sundry shop along Jalan Bandar to refill bidons, and to pose for more photographs.

We made one more stop just after crossing the Langat River to regroup.  When we got back to Jalan Klang Banting, the gloves came off and it was every person for themselves.  Those who wanted to could ride as fast as they liked.  Some of us – I won’t say who – did exactly that.

No matter the speed, we all got back safely to the McDonald’s in Kota Kemuning.  Where most of us immediately ordered something to drink and eat.

“I’ll have a mango sundae.  Make that two mango sundaes.”

I was happy.  And am looking forward to more BCG rides.

BCG Tour Klang – Port Dickson – Klang Day 2

BCG Klang - PD - Klang Logo 2

The photographs are in!  Thank you Johan Sopiee.

The plan for Day 2 was to roll out at about 7.00am.  A few of us crept out of the hotel before dawn for breakfast at McDonald’s.  Trying not to wake up the person at the front desk.

BCG Klang - PD - Day 2 Hotel

Then it was time to put on cycling shoes (which had dried overnight after the ride through the rain), sun tan lotion, inspect our bikes, and wake up the desk clerk so we could check out.

 

 

Fikri, Izzat and I were ready to roll at the appointed hour.  We discovered then that the rest of the group had opted to eat breakfast after putting on their cycling kit and checking out of the hotel.

So the three of us hit the road while the rest went to McDonald’s.

BCG Klang - PD - Day 2 Early Breakfast

Before long we were making the left turn onto Route N4 toward Chuah.  I don’t think the others were that far behind.

By the way, despite what you see in these photographs, the national tree of Malaysia is NOT the oil palm.

BCG Klang - PD - Day 2 Kampung Chuah Oil Palm

The climb of the day came as we approached the left turn to get back onto Route 5.

BCG Klang - PD - Day 2 Kampung Chuah Climb

At 35km / 22mi the route curled through the small town of Sepang, before heading back toward the coast.  That was the closest we would get to the KL International Airport.

BCG Klang - PD - Day 2 Hot Day

It was 8.45am when I rode through Sepang.  I was supposed to be at Morib at 10.00am, to meet up with some Flipside friends, who were riding to Morib from USJ.  Morib is 45km / 27mi from Sepang.  I was going to be late.

I made a short stop at the PETRONAS station in Sungai Pelek.  The same one where Fikri and I stopped on the way to Port Dickson.  As I remounted my bike, Izzat rode by.  I chased after him and we rode together back out toward the coast.

About 8km / 5mi outside Sungai Pelek we came upon the U-turn point for the participants in the Klang Première Century Ride.  That ride started and ended at the Klang Première Hotel in Bandar Botanic, a kilometer or so from where we would finish our ride.

We shared the road back to Bandar Botanic with the Klang Première riders,including some who had decided that they had ridden enough for the day.

BCG Klang - PD - Day 2 Klang Premiere

I got to Morib at about 10.30am.  Alvin, Liang and Mark were still there.  I slurped down an iced Milo and an ais kacang, and enjoyed the sea breeze as we sat in the shade.

BCG Klang - PD - Day 2 Ais Kacang Mark

Photograph courtesy of Mark Lim

Just as we were leaving Morib beach, Fikri rode up behind us.  He had been delayed by a problem with his seat post.  He might have wished he hadn’t caught up with us.  Liang proceeded to set a pace between 35kph /22mph and 40kph / 25mph for the next 20km / 12mi to Telok Panglima Garang.

BCG Klang - PD - Day 2 Flipside 02

It was midday.  And hot.  And the pace had been high.  So a stop at Cendol Santan Sawit Mak Lang was called for.  Nothing like ice cold cendol to induce a touch of brain freeze.

BCG Klang - PD - Day 2 Cendol Brain Freeze Mark

Photograph courtesy of Mark Lim

Brain freeze or not, we stopped again 7km / 4mi later at a PETRONAS station for yet more cold fluid.

It is 5km from that PETRONAS station to the interchange between Jalan Klang Banting, as Route 5 is named at that point, and the KESAS Highway.  Fikri and I waved goodbye to the Flipsiders as they turned right at the interchange toward USJ.   The two of us crossed the KESAS flyover and rolled the final kilometer to the Hotel 99 in Bandar Botanik.

Izzat was already there.  He has a great capacity for riding long distances without stopping.

BCG Klang - PD - Day 2 Finish 03

Happily, everyone else made it to the Hotel 99 safely.

It was another excellent cycling event.  Foogie produced an excellent video summary of the two days.

Many thanks to Danial, Johan, Foogie, and the other participants for making this a fun weekend.

BCG Klang - PD - Day 2 Finish 13

So when is the next BCG Tour?

 

Fun and Food (Not Necessarily in that Order)

Posted on

Morib was the destination this morning.  It is a route I have ridden a few times already.  An Epic Ride describes one of those prior jaunts to the seaside at Morib.

Alvin, Liang, Mark and I got rolling at about 6.45am.  Avoiding the midday heat on the way back was our primary objective.  All looked good as we made our way down the motorcycle path beside the KESAS Highway, through Kota Kemuning and on to Bandar Botanik.  It was an overcast morning, and we had cool conditions as we rode through Telok Panglima Garang and onward to the coast and Morib.

Morib Route

The road along the Langat River to Tanjung Tongkah Lighthouse, previously a section of road in disrepair, has been resurfaced.  Cool weather and smooth tarmac makes for fun riding.

The first order of business once we got to Morib was breakfast.  We stopped at the aptly named Delicious Bread Coffee Shop.

Morib Delicious Bread

The bread was as advertised.  We had ours toasted, with butter and kaya.  Along with nasi lemak, soft-boiled eggs, and iced Milo or coffee.

Morib Breakfast Alvin

Photograph courtesy of Alvin

Yummy yummy!

Morib Breakfast Group Alvin

Photograph courtesy of Alvin

Then it was time for a bit of fun.  Photographs further down the road at the Morib Gold Coast Resort, for no other reason than it has a sign that reads “Morib.”

Morib Gold Coast Mark

Photograph courtesy of Mark

More photographs on the sea wall at the beach at the end of Persiaran Mestika.

Morib Bicycles Alvin

Photograph courtesy of Alvin

And another picture just to prove that we had really ridden to Morib beach.

Morib Group

Photograph courtesy of Alvin

The overcast skies cleared just as we started on the 70km / 44mi ride back to Bandar Sunway.

It was less and less fun as the temperature and humidity ramped up.  By the time we were 15km / 9mi from home, it was properly hot.  So much for an early start to avoid getting toasted on the way back.

Morib Weather

We were only 12km / 7.5mi away from Morib when we made a hydration stop.  The first of a few such stops.  We pulled up to a small sundry shop near Kampong Kathong and bought litres of water, some iced tea and other flavoured waters.

About 20km / 12mi from Morib we had made what in hindsight was an ill-advised detour toward Pulau Carey.  The realisation after 4km / 2.5mi of the detour that it was still a long way to Pulau Carey, coupled with the rising temperature, prompted the smart decision to turn around.

Our next hydration stop was at Cendol Santan Sawit Mak Lang.  A mere 20km / 12mi from the sundry shop.

We didn’t know that there was such a thing as santan sawit.  Santan is the Malay word for coconut milk.  Made, as the name makes clear, with the flesh from the nut of the coconut palm tree. Kelapa sawit is the Malay term for oil palm.  At the time it didn’t make sense to us that santan could be made from the nut of the oil palm tree.  We figured the term “santan sawit” referred to santan made from coconuts that grew amongst the oil palm trees.

I now know that palm oil is used to make a coconut milk substitute.  The aforementioned santan sawit.

Which, despite the complete lack of coconut milk in it, makes a delicious cendol.  Made even better, in this case, by lots and lots of shaved ice.  We even got an extra bowl of shaved ice.

Morib Chendol Mark

Photograph courtesy of Alvin

We made two more hydration stops in the 37km / 23mi between the cendol stall and Bandar Sunway.  Both times at petrol stations.

At the Petronas station 10km / 6mi from Bandar Sunway we met up with some friends who had ridden to Morib as well.  They rode a slightly different route, including a climb to this lookout spot at Jugra.

Morib Dicky Cindy Benjamin Cindy

Photograph courtesy of Cindy

By the time they pulled up at the Petronas station they were looking just as hot and sweaty as we were.

It was 1.45pm by the time we got to our cars.  More drinks, and lunch, were on our minds once we had cleaned up and stuck our bicycles into our vehicles.  Mark led us to Lim Fried Chicken in SS15, Subang Jaya.

Fried chicken, a fried egg, green beans and curry rice, with extra curry gravy and sambal on the side.

Morib Lunch Alvin

Photograph courtesy of Alvin

Chased with ice-cold homemade soya milk.

The ride to Morib and back was suddenly fun again.

 

Rapha Festive 500

Festive 500

I have not covered many kilometers in 2014.  Thanks in no small part to my extended time off the bicycle.  Both self-inflicted and health-inflicted.

My total mileage on 12th October 2014 was the lowest it has ever been on that date in the five years I have been cycling.  That was the day of my first ride in almost four months.  I rode as much as I could, and then had another month of no rides from 23rd November.  Rain and weekend travel are to blame.

Total Distance

Graph courtesy of VeloViewer

So the Rapha Festive 500 came at the perfect time to motivate me to add to my total kilometers ridden in 2014.  The challenge is to ride 500 kms between the 24th and 31st of December.

Rapha has partnered with Strava to keep track of riders’ mileage.  No small undertaking, seeing as 46,360 cyclists are currently in the challenge.

Strava is doing a great job of displaying every participant’s current mileage, and rank overall, by country, by age and by weight.  Strava is also providing additional motivation by presenting riders with ‘achievements’ as they meet interim targets.

125250375

I got the final one today.

500

I have ridden every day since Christmas Eve.  I am putting my vacation time to good use.

Heatmap courtesy of Strava

Heatmap courtesy of Strava

514kms over six days.  Mostly over the usual routes:  Genting Sempah (2), KESAS (3) and (6), and the Guthrie Corridor Expressway (4).

There were a couple of forays into new territory, starting with the first Festive 500 ride on Christmas Eve (1).  Keat, Mark, Marco, Fahmi and I started with a ride to a favourite nasi lemak stop in Kampung Cempedak.  But instead of following breakfast with a ride through Kampung Melayu Seri Kundang, we followed a back road toward Rawang.  Here we are, happy to be at the summit of the climb along Jalan Ciku.

Photograph courtesy of Marco

Photograph courtesy of Marco

The ride that took me over the 500kms target was an entirely new one.  I drove my biker chick to the airport, then parked and pulled my bike out of the car.  It was raining quite hard, but that didn’t stop me from riding alongside runway 2, and the new runway 3 serving KLIA 2, watching aircraft come and go in a cloud of spray.

AA

I didn’t want to continue onto the highway serving the airports, so I doubled back along runway 3 and went to Sepang.  I had fun, but would have enjoyed it more if it hadn’t been raining the entire time.

LCCT Map

Weather permitting, I might get to 600kms by New Year’s Eve.  A relatively large total by my current standards, but paltry in comparison with 1,644kms already ridden by the person leading the Festive 500.  He has cycled almost 14,500kms in 2014.  He must be very fit.  And not have a full-time job.