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Teluk Intan with the R@SKLs – Day 2

Teluk Intan Day 1 Menara Chondong Night Mark

Photograph courtesy of Mark Lim

While we were cooling down in the lobby after arriving at the Yew Boutique Hotel, we talked about a start time for our ride back to Kapar.  6.00am was mentioned.  Jake asked me if that start time eas confirmed.  I told him to wait until after dinner.

Sure enough.  10kg / 22lbs of udang galah in our collective stomachs prompted some recalibration.  Breakfast at the coffee shop across the road from the hotel at 6.30am, and wheels rolling at 7.00am.

Teluk Intan Day 2 Breakfast Pai

Photograph courtesy of Hsing C Pai

We didn’t quite meet our 7.00am departure goal.  Heng Keng took the photograph below.  No prizes for figuring out who was the last person out of the hotel door.

Teluk Intan Day 2 Ready to Roll Pai

Photograph courtesy of Lee Heng Keng

We have developed a routine for Day 2 of these Teluk Intan rides.  Breakfast across the road from the hotel.  Followed by a stop at the 7 Eleven 400 meters down the road for ice and water.  Then onto Jalan Maharajalela and southward out of town.

We thoroughly enjoyed the tailwind from Sabak Bernam to Teluk Intan the previous afternoon.  “Effortless” was one description for that 35km / 22mi section where we hit 40kph / 25mph at times.  Well, we paid the full price for that tailwind, plus interest, on the way back to Kapar.

Teluk Intan Day 2 Wind bicyclenetwork com au

Photograph courtesy of bicyclenetwork.com.au

Kapar is almost directly south of Teluk Intan.  As we left Teluk Intan the wind was blowing north-westward at 4kph.  At 8.00am we were at Hutan Melintang, where the wind was blowing westward at 4kph.  At 9.30am we were at Sabak Bernam, and the wind was blowing north-westward again, but stronger at 13kph.

We turned off Route 5 at Sabak Bernam to follow the secondary roads which run along the coast.  While waiting for the others to ensure that they didn’t miss the turn, Pai handed out kokuto, which is brown sugar candy from Okinawa.  Although kokuto is made from sugar cane, it tastes a lot like gula kabung or gula melaka, which are types of palm sugar.

Kokuto Oikinawan brown sugar candy jpninfo com

Photograph courtesy of jpninfo.com

Around this time a good friend to the R@SKLs, Daniel, was well into his Olympic Distance Race at the Port Dickson International Triathlon 2018.  That consists of a 1.5km open water swim, a 40km bike ride and a 10km run.

Respect!

Teluk Intan Day 2 Danial Tri Danial

Photograph courtesy of Daniel Lim

Despite being on more sheltered roads south of Sabak Bernam, the headwind was just as bad.  The roads were very nice though.

Teluk Intan Day 2 Back Roads Pai

Photograph courtesy of Hsing C Pai

We planned to make our first stop at Sungai Besar, which is 50km / 31km from Teluk Intan.   The extra effort against the headwind meant that we were more than ready for a break in Sungai Besar.  One of the first stalls we came upon was selling fresh coconut water.  After drinking the water straight out of the coconut, it is split open so you can spoon out the jellylike flesh.

Pai’s thirst had been slaked, but he was hungry.  So he crossed the road to the 988 Restaurant for a plate of chicken rice.  Before long three or four others were sitting beside him, eating red bean paste filled pau, and toast with kaya (coconut jam).

We weren’t back on the road for very long before we realised that we had lost Natasha and Marco.  Marco had loaded the route onto his Bryton.  However, the mapped route showed a right turn which didn’t exist in reality.  If you turned right at the next opportunity instead of making a u-turn and backtracking, you were on the wrong road.

Everyone found a shady spot while Lay and I went to find Natasha and Marco.  Despite the headwind now blowing straight into our faces at 16kph, it was getting hot.

Teluk Intan Day 2 Waiting For Lost Trio Pai

Photograph courtesy of Hsing C Pai

We were still on country roads after 75km, with just the odd motorcycle for company.

Teluk Intan Day 2 Back Roads 2 Pai

Photograph courtesy of Hsing C Pai

Then we came upon a Malay wedding kenduri (feast) in full swing.  As sometimes happens in rural villages, the entire width of the road had been taken over by marquees which provided shade for buffet tables and guests eating lunch.

Rather than detour around the blocked section of road, which would have required us to get back onto Route 5, we decided to walk our bikes around the edge of the marquees.

Traditional village hospitality then came to the fore.  We were invited to stay and eat something.  When we declined, we were plied with drinks instead.  The emcee announced that we were coming through, and asked everyone to make way for us as we wound our way between tables.

Quite amazing!

 

Having declined a meal at the wedding feast, we were ready for lunch when we got to Sekinchan.  Marvin said he knew a good restaurant, but wasn’t sure if

a) it was open, and
b) if it was open, whether it would be full by the time we got there.

I wouldn’t have guessed that this is a restaurant.

Teluk Intan Day 2 Lunch Restaurant Jake

Photograph courtesy of Jake Sow

Redang Station No. 15 was open, and there was room for us.  The restaurant is essentially a big room on stilts.  The floor is wood planking, as are the tables and benches.  The back of the restaurant opens out to the jetties where fishing boats unload their catch of the day.

Teluk Intan Day 2 Fishing Boats

Alfred was certainly comfortable.  Admittedly it was 36° C / 97° F outside, and he was done riding for the day.  His wife was going to pick him up after lunch.

Teluk Intan Day 2 No 15 Simon

Photograph courtesy of Simon Soo Hu

The online reviews for Redang Station No. 15 are either glowing or damning.  There doesn’t seem to be a middle ground.  Marvin had already prepped us for what to expect.  The restaurant serves seafood only.  Either steamed or fried.  No fancy sauces.  No rice.  No vegetables.  Just fresh seafood.  And fried noodles if you insist.

Everything we ate was delicious.  The freshest ingredients simply prepared.  Thank you for taking us there Marvin.

 

Apart from its seafood restaurants, Sekinchan in also noted for Redang Beach and the Wishing Tree.

Redang Beach, like almost all beaches on the west coast of Peninsular Malaysia, is nothing special.  The lack of storm activity in the Straits of Melaka limits the scouring action of the sea.  Which means that a layer of silt has built up over the years, making the beaches muddy.

Those kites illustrate the 17kph wind blowing northward straight up the coast.

Teluk Intan Day 2 Pantai Redang 2 Mark Lim

Photograph courtesy of Mark Lim

The Wishing Tree gets lots of visitors.  It came to fame after being featured in the Hong Kong TVB drama “Outbound Love.”  You write a wish on a strip of red cloth, tie each end to a coin with a hole in the middle, and toss the cloth strip into the branches of the tree.

Teluk Intan Day 2 Wishing Tree Jake

Photograph courtesy of Jake Sow

There are about 70km / 43mi between Sekinchan and Kapar.  We knew that the heat and the headwind would make a rest stop essential.  Conveniently, there is a McDonald’s in Kuala Selangor, which is midway between Sekinchan and Kapar.

We spent an hour at that McDonald’s, drinking iced lemon tea, 100 Plus, and Coke.  And eating french fries and chocolate sundaes.  And waiting for Marco and Natasha.  Marco had a mechanical problem with his touring bike, and that was slowing him down.

Not that we were complaining about having to wait in the air conditioning.  It was hot outside.  How hot?  That is crusted salt on Jake’s sleeve, from all the sweating he was doing.

Teluk Intan Day 2 Salt Jake Sow

Photograph courtesy of Jake Sow

We debated staying on Route 5 back to Kapar but decided it wouldn’t be worth riding on a heavily trafficked and rough road to save few kilometres.  So we stayed on the back roads.   This herd of cattle was going with the wind is it meandered all over the road.  The cows and bull appeared to be relatively used to sharing the road.  They weren’t in the least bothered by us riding past them.

Teluk Intan Day 2 Cows Pai

Photograph courtesy of Hsing C Pai

We had to get back onto Route 5 about 10km / 6mi from Adtek. The road surface is very rutted, and the shoulder is covered in all sorts of debris, including broken glass.  The odds of getting a flat tire are high.  I picked up a flat tire on that section the last time we did this ride.  Now it was Marvin’s turn.

The only good thing was that Marvin flatted next to a shaded culvert.  I assure you we did help Marvin fix his flat!

Teluk Intan Day 2 Marvin Flat Lay

Photograph courtesy of Lay Hoi Cheong

We all got back to Adtek safely, which is the most important thing.  Despite the constant headwind, everyone enjoyed the ride.

Being able to shower at Adtek before driving home was a real treat.  Thank you again Pai for giving us access to the facilities at your factory.

We are already thinking about when to do the next Teluk Intan ride.  It could well become a quarterly event.

Let’s get through CFAL first though!

Teluk Intan with the R@SKLs – Day 1

Teluk Intan Day 1 River View 2 Heng Keng

Photograph courtesy of Lee Heng Keng

The two-day ride to Teluk Intan and back has become a favourite for the R@SKLs.  Seven of us did this ride in January 2018.  The main attraction of riding to Teluk Intan is a dinner of Macrobrachium rosenbergii, better known as giant freshwater prawn.

BCG Tour Teluk Intan Udang Galah

Photograph courtesy of Wikipedia

Other attractions of this ride are the doable-in-one-day distance of about 145km / 90mi, the number of quiet backroads along the route, and the cyclist-friendly Yew Boutique Hotel in Teluk Intan.

Not to mention being able to start and end the ride from Pai’s factory premises in Kapar.  For a start, we get assigned parking in a secure parking lot.

teluk-intan-day-0-parking-prep-pai.png

Photograph courtesy of Hsing C Pai

Plus access to restrooms, showers, and a water cooler.  Wonderful!

Fourteen of us were ready to roll out of the Adtek car park at 6.00am.  Including Natasha and Marco, who were celebrating one year of wedded bliss.

Teluk Intan Day 1 Anniversay Couple Marco

Photograph courtesy of Marco Lai

The first forty minutes of the ride was spent negotiating roads which have been damaged by a constant flow of heavy lorries.  Street lighting was poor in places, so everyone had to be on full alert for potholes, bad patch jobs, and road debris.

The sun was peeking over the horizon as we turned right off Route 5 and onto Jalan Suara.

Teluk Intan Day 1 Sunrise Marvin

Photograph courtesy of Marvin Tan

These were the roads we were looking forward to riding on.

Teluk Intan Day 1 Empty Road Mark

Photograph courtesy of Mark Lim

Naturally, everyone was glad to be off the main trunk road that is Route 5.

 

Whenever there was a river to cross we had no choice but to get back onto Route 5.  The first of the bridges was at the small town of Sungai Buloh (literally Bamboo River).  One would expect the river there to be the Sungai Buloh, but it is not.  We crossed the Sungai Sembilang and endured Route 5 for 1.5km / 0.9mi before we were able to turn right onto Jalan Tok Empat Yusuf.

We had 10km / 6mi of quiet backroad almost entirely to ourselves before we had to get onto Route 5 again for the Sungai Selangor crossing at Kuala Selangor.

I had planned for our breakfast stop to be between Sungai Buloh and Kuala Selangor, in a roadside stall at the crossroads between Jalan Teluk Piah Kanan and Jalan Kuala Selangor.  We had stopped there for breakfast the last time we rode to Teluk Intan.

So imagine my dismay when I got there, with thirteen hungry cyclists behind me, to find the stall partially demolished.  Some of the R@SKLs were very hungry.  I know from past experience that hungry cyclists tend to lack a sense of humour.

Luckily for me, some scouting around by the group revealed that the now-demolished stall had morphed into a bigger and better restaurant just around the corner.

Phew!  Good humour restored.

 

Around the time we were finishing breakfast, some other R@Skls were starting their Sprint Race at the Port Dickson International Triathlon 2018.  750 meter open water swim, 20km bike ride and 5km run.  Way to go!

Teluk Intan Day 1 PD Tri Robyn Lim

Photograph courtesy of Robyn Lim

After breakfast, we made it safely back onto Route 5 and over the bridge at Kuala Selangor.

Teluk Intan Day 1 All Smiles Mark

Photograph courtesy of Mark Lim

After exiting Route 5 at Jalan Sungai Tunggul, we would be on roads through paddy fields and rural countryside for the next 67km / 42mi.

Teluk Intan Day 1 Paddy Fields 2 Marvin

Photograph courtesy of Marvin Tan

 

We had covered about 58km / 36mi at a reasonable moving average of 25kph / 15.5mph by the time we got to the far edge of the paddy fields.  We turned left onto Jalan Terusan Utama, which we would stay on for the next 30km / 19mi.

That was the plan.

A group of seven pulled ahead on the flat, straight and quiet road.  The rest of us were rolling along at a slightly more restrained pace when Jeff went down.  He was clearly in pain from an injured shoulder and was unable to continue.

Teluk Intan Day 1 Jeff Marco

Photograph courtesy of Marco Lai

We tried hailing down passers-by in vehicles big enough to carry both Jeff and his bicycle but were unsuccessful.  Fortuitously, there is a rice milling plant, Dataran Pusaka Sdn. Bhd., 300 meters from where Jeff had his accident.  Even more fortuitously, someone from there was willing to load Jeff and bike into his pickup truck and to take them to the nearest town, Sekinchan.

The seven of us who had stopped at the scene rode the 7km / 4mi to Sekinchan.  Jeff was in a clinic waiting to be checked out.  In the meantime, Simon had been on the ‘phone with Alfred, whose family was en route to Teluk Intan in an MPV.  Alfred’s wife agreed to stop in Sekinchan to pick Jeff up from the clinic.

Once we were sure that Jeff was in good hands at the clinic, and that he would be picked up from there, we headed back to Jalan Terusan Utama to continue along our route toward Sabak Bernam, which was our predetermined lunch stop.

The group ahead of us had stopped at a roadside shop while awaiting an update on the situation in Sekinchan.

Teluk Intan Day 1 Waiting and Snacking Heng Keng

Photograph courtesy of Lee Heng Keng

With Jeff sorted out, they rode on to Sabak Bernam.  The rest of us were at least an hour behind them, so they had lunch as soon as they arrived in Sabak Bernam.

Teluk Intan Day 1 Lunch 1 Heng Keng

Photograph courtesy of Lee Heng Keng

Then, clearly overcome with concern for Jeff, they had a massage!

Teluk Intan Day 1 Massage Pai

Photograph courtesy of Hsing C Pai

Lay and Heng Keng were waiting for us at Kedai Kopi Nam May.  It was almost 2.00pm.  The coffee shop staff were a bit concerned that they did not have enough food left to feed us.  But their worry turned out to be unwarranted.  We shared three platters of delicious fried noodles with fish cake.

Massages over and reunited as a group again, we got rolling.  It is a bit under 40km  / 25mi from Sabak Bernam to Teluk Intan.  Those who had done the ride in January were not looking forward to the first five or six kilometers.  For a start, we would be back on Route 5.  In January there were major roadworks in progress between the town and the bridge over the Sungai Bernam.  Lane closures and an awful road surface made riding that section a nightmare.

We needn’t have worried.  The roadworks are complete and that section of road is now a pleasure to ride on.  We also had a significant tailwind to help us along.

Having averaged 34kph / 21mph for 13km / 8mi in 35° C / 97° F heat, we need to cool down when we got to the Petron station at Hutan Melintang.

Teluk Intan Day 1 Petrol Station Ice Crwams Heng Keng

Photograph courtesy of Lee Heng Keng

The wind was still a help over the final 16km / 10mi to Teluk Intan.  The Menara Chondong (Leaning Tower) in Teluk Intan is the symbolic finishing line for this ride.

Congratulations to the first-time riders to Teluk Intan:  Kenix, Natasha, Martin, Jake, and Alfred.

 

Teluk Intan Day 1 Menara Chondong Group Simon

Photograph courtesy of Simon Soo Hu

My Biker Chick had checked everyone into the Yew Boutique Hotel and was waiting with room keys for us.  We parked our bikes in the Cyclists’ Corner off the lobby and headed to our rooms to shower and change into fresh clothes.  All except Alfred.

Jeff had been diagnosed with a suspected fracture, and Alfred’s wife had driven him from Sekinchan back to a hospital in Kuala Lumpur for further checks.  It wasn’t until she had driven back to Teluk Intan that Alfred got a change of clothes.

Some people, including me, dashed off so quickly to their rooms that they left things behind in the hotel lobby.

Teluk Intan Day 1 Lost and Found Marvin

Photograph courtesy of Marvin Tan

After getting cleaned up, some of us met at the food court next door to the hotel for the famous chee cheong fun, and to claim our forgotten belongings.

 

We gathered in the hotel lobby at 7.10pm to either walk, cycle or drive to Restoran d’Tepian Sungai for aforementioned udang galah (giant fresh water prawn) dinner.  11.5kg / 25lbs of udang galah.

I have waxed lyrical in the past about the udang galah dishes at Restoran d’Tepian Sungai.  They were just as good this time.

Teluk Intan Day 1 Dinner 3 Marco

Photograph courtesy of Marco Lai

We had the pleasure of some non-cyclists this time too.  Apart from my biker chick and Alfred’s wife and daughters, we were joined by Marvin’s wife, his two young children and his mother.

We missed Jeff though.  We all hope he heals up fast and completely.

Teluk Intan Day 1 Dinner Group Heng Keng

Photograph courtesy of Lee Heng Keng

You would have thought that after all we ate throughout the day, we would have been stuffed.  If you did think that, then you don’t know the R@SKLs.

After dinner, we walked to the Menara Chondong to take some more photographs.

Teluk Intan Day 1 Menara Chondong 13 Lee Heng Keng

Photograph courtesy of Lee Heng Keng

That worked up a thirst in some of us.  On the way back to the hotel six of us stopped at the Chris Café for a coffee and lemon cheesecake tarts.

 

I was in bed and fast asleep by 10.30pm.  The FIFA World Cup 3rd and 4th place playoff match was broadcast starting at 11.00pm.  I don’t think anyone stayed awake to watch it.

CIMB Challenge Ride 2018

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CIMB Challenge Ride 2018 Banner cimbcycle com

Graphic courtesy of cimbcycle.com

The CIMB Cycle events for this year were originally scheduled for 21st April 2018.  The 14th General Elections got in the way, so the rides were postponed until 7th July 2018.

Read about the 2017 CIMB Cycle event here.

The start and finish were at the Sepang International Circuit, which hosted the Malaysian Formula One Grand Prix for many years.

CIMB Challenge 2018 Start Nicole Andrian

Photograph courtesy of Nicole Andrian

There were two CIMB Cycle options.  Either the 90km Challenge Ride or the 160km Endurance Ride.  The R@SKLs opted for the Challenge Ride.

In retrospect that was a good decision.  A few of us had stayed up almost the entire previous night to watch the World Cup quarterfinals.  One of us, having flown into Kuala Lumpur late on the eve of the ride, had to sleep in a chair at the airport after discovering that he had booked an airport hotel room for the wrong night.

The first of the R@SKLs got to the Sepang International Circuit at just after 6.00am.

CIMB Challenge Ride 2018 Early Girls Leonard Yee

Photograph courtesy of Leonard Yee

Pretty in pink!  With some men in the mix for gender balance!

CIMB Challenge Ride 2018 Early Arrivals Simon Soo Hu

Photograph courtesy of Simon Soo Hu

The rest of us got caught up in the queue with 3,000 other participants, first, to get into the parking area, and second, to find a parking spot.

We all eventually made it to the starting point.  I didn’t count how many were in our group.  I reckon about 30.

CIMB Challenge Ride 2018 Ready to Roll Johan Sopiee

Photograph courtesy of Johan Sopiee

CIMB Challenge Ride 2018 Ready to Roll 2 Johan Sopiee

Photograph courtesy of Johan Sopiee

The event was very well organised.  The only complaint I had – and it is a common complaint of mine – is that we were flagged off late.  One explanation I heard for this was that the start was delayed to give more time to those who got caught in the traffic jam to join the rest of us who were ready to roll.

The delay did give us more time for photographs though.

CIMB Challenge Ride 2018 Guadalupe and Annie and Luanne Annie Lim

Photograph courtesy of Annie Lim

CIMB Challenge Ride 2018 Waiting for the Rest Simon Soo Hu

Photograph courtesy of Simon Soo Hu

CIMB Challenge Ride 2018 Guadalupe and Manuel Guadalupe Cernusco

Photograph courtesy of Guadalupe Cernusco

The Challenge Ride route started with a loop around the SIC race track, followed by a roughly 10km long speed-controlled stretch before we were all let loose on the road to Sepang.

CIMB Challenge Ride 2018 Around the Track Bin Soo

Photograph courtesy of Bin Soo

The police and marshalls did an excellent job along the route.  All junctions and intersections were actively manned, and traffic was stopped to allow riders to proceed uninterrupted.  This alone is usually enough to win kudos for an event organiser.  The police and marshalls at this event outdid themselves by taking traffic off the road completely whenever they could.

I estimate that for 80% of the route, the police and marshalls pulled vehicles over onto the road shoulders, giving riders a clear road.

CIMB Challenge Ride 2018 Quiet Roads Chiam GH

Photograph courtesy of Chiam GH

This was fantastic for the participants.  However, the organiser’s Facebook page quickly filled up with complaints from motorists who were delayed by the traffic controls for the event.  Apparently, some people missed flights because they were held up while on the way to the airport.

CIMB Challenge Ride 2018 Route cimbcycle com

Map courtesy of cimbcycle.com

Unlike last year’s CIMB Cycle event, there were no big climbs to get over this time.  Nevertheless, the rolling terrain presented lots of short, punchy climbs.  This was no flat easy run.

We were ready for the aid stations when they came along.  More kudos to the organisers for having enough water, bananas and ice on hand.

CIMB Challenge Ride 2018 Bananas Nelson Chen

Photograph courtesy of Nelson Chen

By the time we got to the second aid station almost all the climbing was behind us.  That was the positive.  The negative was that it was hot.  The heat was radiating off the road surface.

CIMB Challenge Ride 2018 Hot AiLin Ku Pinky

Photograph courtesy of AiLin Ku Pinky

It felt even hotter during the final loop on the Sepang racetrack before the finish.  I think we were all glad to pass under the Start / Finish banner.

CIMB Challenge Ride 2018 Finish Line 1

CIMB Challenge Ride 2018 Finish Line 2

CIMB Challenge Ride 2018 Finish Line 3

Then it was time to cool off in the shade.

CIMB Challenge Ride 2018 Finished Lee Heng Keng

Photograph courtesy of Lee Heng Keng

We all got finisher’s medals.

I  must give a big shout out to Danial Lim, who backtracked a number of times along the route to make sure that all the R@SKLs to safely to the finish line.  Thank you Danial.

CIMB Challenge Ride 2018 Danial Simon Soo Hu

Photograph courtesy of Simon Soo Hu

Much appreciation also to Heng Keng, for helping the R@SKLs with registration for this event, and for picking up our race packs for us.

Heng Keng even managed to get us a photo opportunity with Zafrul Aziz, the CEO of CIMB Group Holdings (in the red shirt to the left) and Azizul Awang, the first Malaysian to win a UCI World Championship (in the red shirt on the right).

CIMB Challenge Ride 2018 Zafrul Azizul Lee Heng Keng

Photograph courtesy of Lee Heng Keng

The highlight of the day was, as always, the camaraderie and laughter that is the hallmark of the R@SKLs.

A close second was the experience of riding on the Sepang track where Formula One champions like Michael Schumacher, Fernando Alonso, Sebastian Vettel, and Louis Hamilton once raced.  The SIC does occasionally open the race track to cyclists.  The R@SKLs may be back at the Sepang International Circuit the next time that happens.

SIC

Photograph courtesy of marca.com

 

Silca T-Ratchet + Ti-Torque Kit

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Like many cyclists, I own some tools.  The tools I use the most are hex wrenches.

Hex wrenches

A set of hex wrenches will loosen and tighten almost every fastener on a bicycle.  Hex wrenches like the ones above are not perfect tools though.

One drawback is that some hex nuts, especially those which hold carbon components in place, should be tightened to the manufacturer’s specifications using a torque wrench.  Trying to tighten by feel is risky.  A cracked carbon component is expensive to replace.

A second drawback is that hex wrenches are not easy to use when there is limited space around a hex bolt because it is surrounded, for example, by a bottle cage, or the hex bolt is hard to see because it is buried in a recess in a seat post.  Having to constantly reseat the hex wrench in tight confines, or when the hex bolt cannot be seen, is frustrating.

The Silca T-Ratchet + Ti-Torque Kit addresses both those drawbacks.  The titanium torque beam lets you tighten bolts to a set pressure.  The reversible ratchet lets you spin bolts without having to disengage and re-engage the bit with the bolt head.

T Ratchet + Ti Torque

Photograph courtesy of silca.cc

Silca has a reputation for making tools of the highest quality, with expertly finished components that are aesthetically and ergonomically pleasing.  This is certainly true of the T-Ratchet + Ti-Torque Kit.

The steel 72-tooth reversible ratchet, titanium torque beam, steel extension bit, and stainless steel handle extension can be set up to work in either a T or an L-handled configuration.  The four parts of the system are held together through magnetic interfaces.  This sounds like it may be prone to failure, but the connection achieved is tight and secure.

silca-t-ratchet-kit-and-ti-torque-kit-detail-2 road cc

Photograph courtesy of road.cc

The set comes with ten hardened steel bits:  six hex keys ranging from 2mm to 6mm in size, T10, T20 and T25 torx keys, and a 2mm Phillips Head bit.

silca-t-ratchet-kit-and-ti-torque-kit-detail Road cc

Photograph courtesy of road.cc

Everything is kept in a beautiful waxed canvas cloth case. The case has small compartments for the various elements of the torque and ratchet system, as well as for all the bits. The case is magnetically sealed, meaning that it snaps shut and is kept nice and compact.

The Silca T-Ratchet + Ti-Torque Kit is now my set of choice for working on hex and Torx bolts.  The way in which you can use the tool in a T or L configuration, with a short or long reach, means no adjustment is out of bounds.

The torque beam will measure between 2Nm and 8Nm, which covers all the areas of the bike that you are likely to need to tighten to a set pressure, such as handlebar faceplates, stems and seat posts.

T Ratchet + Ti Torque in use Silca

Photograph courtesy of silca.cc

The Silca T-Ratchet + Ti-Torque Kit is a very high-quality toolset that is well worth the (big) investment.

 

 

The R@SKLs Birthday Ride for TH

The word went out one month ago.  There would be a special santai (relaxed) ride followed by lunch to celebrate TH’s birthday.

Then the route was revealed.  We ride from the Veg Fish Farm Thai Restaurant car park through Batu 14 and over Bukit Hantu to the Sungai Tekala Recreation Forest.  We would then retrace our route back over Bukit Hantu and up 3km / 1.9mi of the climb to Lookout Point back to the restaurant.  So much for a santai ride.

TH Birthday Original Route

Map courtesy of Ride With GPS

The day before the ride I was asked to map an alternate route for the “less strong” riders who didn’t want to climb Bukit Hantu.

There was really only one option.   Ride from Batu 14 to Batu 18, and then along Jalan Sungai Lui and Jalan Sungai Lalang to the Jalan Sungai Tekali junction.  Then turn around and ride the same route in reverse.

TH Birthday Alternate Route

Map courtesy of Ride With GPS

The alternate route prompted lots of chatter about where to start the ride.  The thought of 140 meters / 460 feet of climbing to get back to the restaurant with Bukit Hantu in our legs didn’t appeal to many.  So we decided to park at the Gou Lou Chicken Rice shop on Jalan Sungai Tekali.

That turned out to be a good choice not just because it eliminated that final climb.  We discovered that the road from the restaurant car park to Jalan Hulu Langat was not only bumpy and heavily patched, it was also steep.  70 meters / 230 feet of elevation over 0.6km / 0.4mi.

Twenty-five of us turned up for TH’s birthday ride.  A discussion in the Gou Lou Chicken Rice shop car park on the relative merits of each of the proposed routes ended with everyone deciding to do the Bukit Hantu climb.

We regrouped at the top of the climb, and again after the descent.

And when everyone got to the Sungai Tekala Recreation Forest, we decided to continue on to the Fatt Hwa Gong Temple in Semenyih.

TH Birthday Route

Map courtesy of Ride With GPS

Two riders chose to wait at the Sungai Tekala Recreation Forest while the rest of us rode to the temple.

“The temple is only 5km from here,” said a few in the group.

Yeah right.  It was 12km / 7.5mi later that we were on the steps of the temple.

TH Birthday Temple Johan S

Photograph courtesy of Marvin Tan

The jaunt to the temple added 25km / 15.5mi to our ride.  When we got back to the Sungai Tekala Recreation Forest we all decided that we would tackle to climb back over Bukit Hantu rather than ride the flatter but longer route to Batu 18 and then back to Batu 14.

It was a challenge going up the steeper side, but everyone got over Bukit Hantu for the second time that morning.  It felt warmer than the thermometer temperature of 29°C / 84°F.  Cold drinks were required before we drove to the Veg Fish Farm Thai Restaurant.

We had some time to burn anyway as lunch wasn’t until 11.00am.

TH Birthday Ride After Drinks Luanne

Photograph courtesy of Luanne Sieh

The restaurant is built around a large fish pond.  The food is delivered from the kitchen to various sections of the restaurant by a small motorboat.

TH Birthday Ride Restaurant Luanne

Photograph courtesy of Luanne Sieh

And food there was aplenty.

Of course there was cake too.

TH Birthday Ride Cake Mark

Photograph courtesy of Mark Lim

Naely and Kevin also have birthdays in June.

TH Birthday Ride Trio

Photograph courtesy of Kenix Chiang

Everyone was stuffed to the gills (pardon the seafood pun!)

Thank you TH for inviting us to a fabulous lunch after a tough but enjoyable ride.  And an especially big thank you to Alison for the behind-the-scenes organisation.

TH Birthday Ride cake cutting

Photograph courtesy of Kenix Chiang

TH Birthday Banner

Chamang Waterfall with the R@SKLs

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Chamang Banner odysseyonline com

Photograph courtesy of odysseyonline.com

My body clock usually wakes me up before the alarm clock goes off.  I was awake before the alarm clock buzzed this morning, but this time it was thunder and lightning at 4.30am which stirred me.  Not a good omen for a ride that thirty people had signed up for.

It was still raining in most of Kuala Lumpur at 6.00am.  The last time this happened, I stayed in bed.  Only to later see R@SKLs smiling in group photographs taken on dry roads.

This time I took the chance that it would be dry in Bukit Tinggi.  Kedai Makan dan Minum Zheng Ji (literally translated as Zheng Ji Eat and Drink Shop) in Bukit Tinggi was the designated meeting point for the start of the ride.

Depending on where you live in Kuala Lumpur, Bukit Tinggi is 40km to 50km / 25mi to 31mi away.  The rain put some people off from driving that far.  I started to have my own doubts as I drove through the rain at Genting Sempah, which is 5km / 3mi from Zheng Ji.

I needn’t have worried.  The rain had stopped by the time I parked my car.  Half a dozen buddies were already sitting over hot drinks at Zheng Ji, and more were arriving by the minute.  Twenty-eight riders were ready to roll at 7.20am.  The roads were wet, but the rain had stopped.

Chamang Start 01 Lee Heng Keng

Photograph courtesy of Lee Heng Keng

Chamang Start Lee Heng Keng

Photograph courtesy of Lee Heng Keng

Our destination was the Chamang waterfall, with a stop in Bentong on the way for breakfast.

Chamang Route

It is about 28km / 17.4mi from Bukit Tinggi to Bentong.  Almost all of it downhill.  We were on the old road between Kuala Lumpur and Bentong.  The old road runs alongside the Kuala Lumpur – Karak Highway, which was opened in the 1970s to provide a faster and safer link between Kuala Lumpur and the east coast of Peninsular Malaysia.

There is usually very little traffic on the old road.  Add the overcast skies and you have very pleasant conditions for a ride.  Despite the short flooded section and the occasional rutted patch of tarmac.

Chamang On The Road 03 Marco Lai

Photograph courtesy of Marco Lai

Chamang On The Road 01 Khoo Bin Soo

Photograph courtesy of Khoo Bin Soo

Among us were some cyclists who had never ridden this route before.  We stopped after 11km / 7mi at Bentong Hot Spring to regroup.

Chamang Bentong Hot Spring gobentong com

Photograph courtesy of gobentong.com

All smiles at this point.

Chamang Hot Springs 03 Mark Lim

Photograph courtesy of Mark Lim

Chamang Hot Springs 01 Arthur Ang

Photograph courtesy of Arthur Ang

The next regrouping location was the Shell station on the edge of Bentong town.  Clearly some fiddling was going on here.

Chamang Bentong Shell Station 02 Marco Lai

Photograph courtesy of Marco Lai

Chamang Bentong Shell Station 03 Marco Lai

Photograph courtesy of Marco Lai

Then it was on to breakfast at Kedai Kopi dan Makanan Kow Hing (Kow Hing Coffee and Food Shop).

Chamang Bentong Breakfast Marco Lai

Photograph courtesy of Marco Lai

Napoleon Bonaparte said Une armée marche sur son ventre (An army marches on its stomach).

In the case of the R@SKLs, Le peloton monte sur son ventre (The peloton rides on its stomach).

Stomachs ready for more cycling, it was on to Chamang waterfall.  The ride to the waterfall requires about 200 metres / 655 feet of climbing.  Which is even more of a challenge when you are on a touring bike, as Marco was.

Chamang Entrance Marco Lai

Photograph courtesy of Marco Lai

The work was worth it.  The waterfall was in full flow.  The heavy rain the night before meant that there was a greater volume of water than usual tumbling down the rock face.

Chamang Waterfall 03

Group photo time.

Chamang Waterfall Group Hsing C Pai

Photograph courtesy of Hsing C Pai

Those darned photobombers!

Chamang Waterfall 01 Lee Heng Keng

Photograph courtesy of Lee Heng Keng

The first time I rode to Chamang waterfall was in 2013 with the Flipsiders.  It was very nice to be still riding with some of that group.

Chamang Flipside Marco Lai 02

Photograph courtesy of Marco Lai

Usually, where hills are involved, our rides end with a descent.  This time the last part of our ride was the 550 meter / 1,800 foot climb from Bentong to Bukit Tinggi.

Still smiling!

Chamang On The Road 02 Marco Lai

Photograph courtesy of Marco Lai

We made the obligatory stop in Bentong to take photos in front of the big sign.

Chamang Bentong Sign 01 Lee Heng Keng

Photograph courtesy of Lee Heng Keng

Paul deserves a solo photo for smiling through the longest ride he has done for some time.  Despite getting a puncture.

Chamang Bentong Sign 02 Lee Heng Keng

Photograph courtesy of Lee Heng Keng

Everyone finished the ride safely, albeit sweatily because the sun had come out and the humidity had soared over the last 20km / 12.5mi.  Just what we didn’t need on the uphill road.

Stomachs needed refilling in Bukit Tinggi.

I’m sure the R@SKLs will do this ride again soon.  Those who slept in are demanding it!

The R@SKLs get fried

Temperature

I suspect what will be remembered most about today’s ride to Pulau Carey is how hot it was while we were riding back to Kota Kemuning.  It got up to 37° C / 99° F.  Combine the temperature with the humidity of almost 70%, and the temperature felt like 45° C /  113° F.  Even a rare tailwind – hooray – between Jenjarom and Bandar Rimbayu did nothing to cool us down.

Route

We shouldn’t have been surprised that it got so hot.  It felt warmer and more humid than usual at 6.15am when the first R@SKLs arrived at Restoran BR Maju.  Warning sign #1.

Carey Island early arrival

Photograph courtesy of Alfred Chan

30 of us were ready to roll at 7.00am.  Under a cloudless sky.  Warning sign #2.

Carey Island start

Photograph courtesy of Lee Heng Keng

Twenty minutes later we were riding through Bandar Rimbayu, with the sun already making its presence felt as it rose above the horizon. Warning sign #3.

Carey Island riding

Photograph courtesy of Mark Lim

We were in Jenjarom at 8.00am.  The temperature was 28° C / 82° F.  About half of the group could only do a short ride and were turning back at Jenjarom.  We all flooded into a coffee shop for breakfast before the group split up.

Carey island breakfast

Photograph courtesy of TH Lim

Carey island breakfast 2

Photograph courtesy of Jiv Sammanthan

40 minutes later 17 of us continued on to Pantai Tanjung Rhu, Pulau Carey.  We were very happy to see that sections of Jalan Klang Banting had recently been resurfaced.  Including the section between the Lebuhraya Lembah Klang Selatan flyover and Jalan Bandar Lama, which had been exceptionally badly rutted and potholed.

As you can see from the route map above, Pulau Carey is barely an island.  The land mass of Pulau Carey is separated from the peninsula by the Langat River and a narrow meandering finger of the Strait of Malacca.

When we got to the sea at 9.20am, the tide was out.

Carey Island panorama

Photograph courtesy of Luanne Sieh

There was no shade, which was inconvenient as Jiv had a puncture just as we got to the end of the road.  There was quite a bad cut in his tire, so the fix was a bit involved and took some time.  CK to the rescue!

Carey Island flat

Photograph courtesy of Jiv Sammanthan

We interrupted the repair for a group photograph.  It was too hot to linger, so as soon as Jiv’s tire was fixed we started the return leg to Kota Kemuning.

Carey Island group

Photograph courtesy of Lee Heng Keng

By 10.30am we had covered the 16km / 10mi between the beach and our regular cendol stall.  Wet, ice cold and sweet.  Just what the doctor ordered when it was 32° C / 90° F and felt closer to 37° C / 99° F.

Carey Island cendol

Photograph courtesy of Mark Lim

The temperature kept climbing as we rode the 28km / 17mi from the cendol stop to Restoran BR Maju in Kota Kemuning.  We needed a short rest in the shade at Kampung Sri Cheeding after 15km / 9mi.

Lots of sunblock and sunscreen were applied today.  Nevertheless, I suspect some of us got burnt over the last 35minutes of the ride today.  It was a scorcher!  Probably hot enough to do this.

Carey Island fried egg

Photograph courtesy of alert-conservation.org