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The Germans visit Malaysia Part 2

Day 4

There were two items on the itinerary for Monday. A road trip to Melaka and Leonard’s 3-in-1 party.

The road trip started with a bak kut teh breakfast at Restoran Ah Hei Bak Kut Teh.

Photograph courtesy of TH Lim

Once on the road to Melaka, it became clear that the Jalan Alor food stalls and/or alcohol had claimed one victim.
Luckily a nap and some non-alcoholic Malta drink rejuvenated Matthias.

Photograph courtesy of TH Lim

Pai and TH took the Germans sightseeing in Melaka.

Photograph courtesy of Hsing C Pai
Photograph courtesy of TH Lim
Photograph courtesy of TH Lim
Photograph courtesy of TH Lim

Lunch was at Restoran Seng Kee.

Photograph courtesy of TH Lim
Photograph courtesy of TH Lim

I don’t think the Germans remember much about the drive back to Kuala Lumpur.

Photograph courtesy of TH Lim

Leonard’s 3-in-1 party was at the Grand Imperial restaurant in the Bangsar Shopping Centre. 3-in-1 because 1. the Germans were here, 2. because he recently scored a hole-in-one, and 3. it was his birthday later that week.

Photograph courtesy of Leonard Yee
Photograph courtesy of Leonard Yee
Photograph courtesy of Leonard Yee

I must say Ralf was resplendent in his lederhosen. Doing it “My Way!”

Photograph courtesy of Leonard Yee

But he sometimes runs out of steam.

Photograph courtesy of Leonard Yee

Leonard was a wonderful host. He does talk a lot though ūüí¨ūüí¨ūüí¨.

Photograph courtesy of Leonard Yee

Day 5

The Day 5 ride was 115km from Tanjung Malim to Simpang Pulai.

Some bikes went into Amy’s truck. The other bicycles and people went into three other vehicles.

Photograph courtesy of TH Lim

It took about an hour to drive to Tanjung Malim. We parked beside a Shell station and got ready to roll. The entire ride would be on Federal Route 1.

Map courtesy of Ride With GPS

It was 31¬ļC when we got to Sungkai. We stopped for drinks and ice-cream.

Photograph courtesy of Lee Heng Keng

Zaryl had a more urgent reason to stop. Her saddle had come off her seat post. It was Patrik the mechanic to the rescue.

Photograph courtesy of Hsing C Pai

12km further up the road, we arrived at a fresh fruit stall. Iced mango tastes very good when it is 35¬ļC.

The heat didn’t bother Marc though.

Photograph courtesy of TH Lim

We made another drink stop at Tapah.

Photograph courtesy of TH Lim

We had lunch at Kampar. We were 85km into the ride.

Photograph courtesy of Lee Heng Keng

That is when Patrik discovered his souvenirs from the Hyatt House Hotel.

Photograph courtesy of Hsing C Pai

Pai dressed for the heat when we left Kampar.

Photograph courtesy of Dieter Fecher

At 2:30 pm we were in Gopeng. The air-conditioned KFC was closed for renovations. We had drinks in the open-air Alif Cafe instead.

I had a puncture 4km from our destination ūü§¨.

Photograph courtesy of Hsing C Pai

I must admit that one flat tire among twelve cyclists riding 115km each is good going.

Happy to be at the Mornington Hotel.

Photograph courtesy of Lee Heng Keng
Photograph courtesy of Lee Heng Keng

After a shower some of the group went for a massage. Starting with the feet.

Photograph courtesy of Hsing C Pai

Then it was dinner time. The restaurant TH chose for us was hosting a wedding that night. I think the wedding party was a bit worried when our scruffy group walked in the door.

We were seated upstairs, though. Out of sight of the wedding guests.

The highlight of the meal was the steamed grouper head. Which was something out of the ordinary for our German guests.

Photograph courtesy of TH Lim

Day 6

Our Day 5 ride had been our longest. Our Day 6 ride would have the most elevation.

We checked out of the Mornington Hotel and rode a few kilometres to breakfast at Restoran Nasi Kandar Pulai.

Photograph courtesy of TH Lim

The road is fairly flat until the PETRONAS station about 5km from the Mornington Hotel. Then it starts to rise. Gently for 7km, and then more sharply to the border between the states of Perak and Pahang.

Map courtesy of Ride With GPS

The road was relatively quiet, and it was cooler than it was the day before.

Photograph courtesy of TH Lim

It wasn’t long before we were spread out along the road.

Photograph courtesy of TH Lim
Photograph courtesy of TH Lim

That sign reads “Heavy Vehicles Keep Left.”

Photograph courtesy of Hsing C Pai
Photograph courtesy of Chan Chee Leong
Photograph courtesy of Chan Chee Leong
Photograph courtesy of Chan Chee Leong
Photograph courtesy of Chan Chee Leong
Photograph courtesy of Chan Chee Leong

Thank goodness for our support vehicles. They created a buffer between us and what little traffic was on the road.

Photograph courtesy of TH Lim

And were on hand when there was a puncture and a floor pump was needed.

Photograph courtesy of Chan Chee Leong

The support vehicles waited at the 43km point in case any of us wanted water, or in the case of the Germans, beer.

Photograph courtesy of TH Lim
Photograph courtesy of TH Lim

The Waterfall Café is 6km further up the road. We all stopped there for a rest, a drink, and some roasted peanuts.

The state border is 4km from the Waterfall Café.

Photograph courtesy of Hsing C Pai

It is another 30km and 800 metres of climbing from the border to Brinchang. There is some relief in the form of a 9km descent from Blue Valley to Kuala Terla.

Kampung Raja is roughly halfway down that descent. We stopped for lunch at Restoran Lai Ki in Kampung Raja. Lemon chicken, batter-fried squid, fish in oyster sauce and fried greens hit the spot.

The virgin jungle between Kampung Raja and Brinchang is gone. Vegetable farms, tea plantations, and hotels and restaurants have replaced the trees.

Map courtesy of Ride With GPS

There were no more tree-lined roads like this for the last 20km to Strawberry Park Resort.

Photograph courtesy of TH Lim

There are potholes and patches on the road from Kampung Raja to Brinchang. We had to be careful on the fast descents.

Everyone got to Strawberry Park Resort safely. TH’s suite was the hangout room of choice.

Photograph courtesy of TH Lim

Patrik lit a fire.

Photograph courtesy of TH Lim

Some serious rehydration happened in front of that fire.

Kelin drove up from Kuala Lumpur to join us for barbecued steaks, lamb and chicken accompanied by sweet potatoes, sweet corn, potato salad and green salad.

And pasta. TH demonstrated his chef chops by cooking two versions of spaghetti Frutti di Mare. With marinara sauce and with alfredo sauce.

TH also provided a soundtrack via his Bluetooth speaker. Hits from the 80’s and 90’s.

The evening ended with dessert and wine. A lot of wine.

Credit Card Tour to Port Dickson and Melaka

Photograph courtesy of Danial Marzuki

When the four of us were planning this trip we referred to it as road bikepacking. I have since discovered that is is not the correct term for what we did. Bikepacking involves at least one or more nights of camping.

What we did was credit card cycle touring. Which is essentially like bikepacking but without the camping gear. Accommodation was procured with our credit cards.

Day 1: Kuala Lumpur to Port Dickson. 108km / 67mi.

Map courtesy of Ride With GPS

Three Apiduras and one Topeak met early in the morning at the Shell station on Jalan Kampung Pandan in Kuala Lumpur. We got onto the Maju Expressway and rode south through Cyberjaya to Dengkil where we stopped for breakfast. From Dengkil we rode to Sepang. This is a section of Federal Route 29 somewhere around Kota Warisan.

Photograph courtesy of Danial Marzuki

We stopped at the Shell station in Sepang to refill bottles.

Photograph courtesy of Danial Marzuki

From Sepang, we would normally have ridden onto Federal Route 5 toward Port Dickson. But Choo Chian and Halim had never been on the little ferry that crosses the Sepang River at Sungai Pelek. So we rode 8km / 5mi in the opposite direction so we could take that 70-metre ferry ride.

Photograph courtesy of Mohd Farid Abu Bakar

The ferry carries pedestrians, motorbikes and bicycles. Contrary to Chris de Burgh’s advice, you pay the ferryman when you board. 80 sen / US20 cents per person and bicycle.

Danial, Choo Chian, Halim and I on the ferry.

Photograph courtesy of Danial Marzuki
Photograph courtesy of Danial Marzuki

It was 12km from the ferry to rejoin Federal Route 5 south of Sepang at Tanah Merah.

Photograph courtesy of Danial Marzuki
Photograph courtesy of Heng Choo Chian

And a further 15km / 9mi to the Waterfront Boutique Hotel in Port Dickson. We got there at 12.45pm, which was a bit early to check in. So we spent an hour over lunch at the McDonald’s nearby to pass the time.

The rest of the afternoon and evening was spent washing cycling kit (Choo Chian and I hung our kit to dry on a lamp post outside the hotel), napping and eating and drinking at PappaRich, Double Queue Thai Cuisine (the pad thai was pretty good) and Starbucks. All within walking distance of the Waterfront Boutique Hotel.

The Waterfront Boutique Hotel is in a commercial development that houses a bank, a 7-Eleven and a number of other restaurants. So the location is excellent. Another plus point is that bicycles are allowed in guest rooms. The only downside is that you have to carry your bike up and down stairs. No lifts.

Day 2: Port Dickson to Melaka. 84km / 52mi.

We were up early for the ride to Melaka. While Danial and Halim were getting ready, Choo Chian and I perused the bun shelves at the 7-Eleven looking for something for Halim to nibble before we started riding. We were spoiled for choice.

We were on Federal Route 5 towards Melaka at about 6.30am.

Photograph courtesy of Heng Choo Chian

The road was very quiet.

Photograph courtesy of Heng Choo Chian

Federal Route 5 follows the coast from Port Dickson until Pasir Panjang, where it heads inland to Linggi. We turned right off Federal Route 5 onto Jalan Pasir Panjang – Kuala Linggi (N143) and immediately stopped at a roadside restaurant for breakfast. Halim and Danial were happy at the prospect of food.

Photograph courtesy of Heng Choo Chian

The N143 continues along the coast. It becomes Federal Route 138 as it crosses the Linggi River, which at that point forms the border between the states of Negeri Sembilan and Melaka.

At Kuala Sungai Baru we left Federal Route 138 to ride along Jalan Telok Gong / Pengkalan Balak, which hugs the beach facing the Straits of Malacca for about 5km / 3mi. There is a concrete jetty at Kampung Sungai Tuang which we couldn’t resist riding onto.

Photograph courtesy of Heng Choo Chian
Photograph courtesy of Danial Marzuki

At 10.45am we were at Klebang. The day was starting to get hot (it was 37¬ļC / 99¬ļF when we got to Port Dickson the day before). Not that we needed an excuse to stop at Klebang Original Coconut Shake.

Photograph courtesy of Halim Zin

The home of the best coconut shakes in Melaka.

Photograph courtesy of Danial Marzuki

Choo Chian told us that we must visit Baba Charlie Nyonya Cake next. The Baba Nyonyas, also known as the Straits-born Chinese, are the descendants of Chinese immigrants¬†who came to the Malay archipelago between the 15th and 17th centuries. They have developed a unique “Nyonya” cuisine which includes a wide variety of traditional kuih or cakes.

Photograph courtesy of Baba Charlie Nyonya Cake

It took a bit of time to find Baba Charlie despite it being only 3km / 2mi from Klebang Original Coconut Shake. When we got there we found that it is a take away kuih shop. No tables and chairs there.

But we also found out that there is a Baba Charlie Cafe less than 500 metres from the kuih shop. With AC and a lunch menu. It wasn’t noon yet so we have lots of time to burn before we could check in to the hotel. So we had a Nyonya meal.

Lemak nenas prawns, Cincalok fried omelette, brinjal udang kering and chicken curry. And kuih and cendol for dessert.

Photograph courtesy of Danial Marzuki

It ws 1.30pm. I was stuffed. And it was 38¬ļC/ 100¬ļF outside. Thank goodness it was only 4km / 2.5mi to the Fenix Inn. Our hotel for the night. Another bicycle-friendly hotel that allows bikes in guest rooms. Once again we asked for rooms on the first floor so we only had one flight of stairs to negotiate.

And once again the afternoon itinerary included laundry, a nap and a visit to the corner Starbucks. Once the day had cooled down we walked to dinner at Pak Putera Restaurant, which has a reputation as one of the better tandoori and naan restaurants in Melaka. We sat outside in the open air, which was pleasant. The food was merely okay, though I must admit that the tandoori chicken was good.

Day 3: Melaka to Tampin. 38km / 24mi.

We had another early start. We wanted to catch the 9.10am KTM Komuter train from Tampin station to KL Sentral station. That meant leaving the Fenix Inn at about 6.30am. Not that we got very far before stopping for breakfast. There is a McDonald’s 100 metres from the Fenix Inn.

The ride was unremarkable apart from the strong wind, which seemed to be against us for the entire ride. When we got to the station the train was already at the platform. We scanned out Komuter Link cards at the turnstile (KTM has introduced stored value cards as the payment mechanism for Komuter journeys) and took our customary places in car 6. As is often the case, we were the only occupants.

Photograph courtesy of Danial Marzuki

Other passengers did join us in that car as the train made its way to KL Sentral station. The Komuter trains on the southern route seem to have more passengers than the Komuter service to the north of Kuala Lumpur. Perhaps because the southern route connects to the KLIA Express and to the long-distance bus terminal at Bandar Tasik Selatan.

It is a two-hour ride with sixteen stops from Tampin station to KL Sentral station. It is a short walk through the KL Sentral station concourse to the street outside.

Photograph courtesy of Halim Zin

Danial had the shortest ride home. Choo Chian, Halim and I had about 8km / 5mi to pedal to get to where each of us lives.

We all enjoyed our latest credit card tour. Lots of fun and laughter. We are ready to do another one. The only question is . . .

Graphic courtesy of Bitmoji

The short way home

We checked out of the hotel at 7.30am.  We rode out in a drizzle to look for breakfast.  You can always count on a mamak restaurant to be open at any hour of the night or day.

After breakfast, we rode to the usual photograph spots.  First the Porta de Santiago, a small gatehouse which is the only part of A Famosa, a former Portuguese fortress, still standing today.  A Famosa is among the oldest surviving European architectural remains in Southeast Asia and the Far East.

Photograph courtesy of Mark Lim

Then we went to Christ Church Melaka.  Construction of Christ Church Malacca started in 1741 and it was completed in 1753.  When the British took over Malacca they added a weathercock and bell to Christ Church and transformed it from a Protestant church into an Anglican one.

Photograph courtesy of Mark Lim

We had decided over dinner the night before to amend our plan for the day.  Originally we were going to ride to the KTM station in Rembau, where we would catch a Komuter train to KL Sentral station.  The Rembau station is 58km / 36mi from Melaka.

We decided instead to ride to the KTM station in Tampin, which is 40km / 25mi from Melaka.  We would be very glad that we chose to ride to the closer station.

We rode through the narrow streets of historic Melaka to the AMJ highway.  The highway took us north to Alor Gajah. 

Photograph courtesy of Mark Lim

We left the AMJ highway at Alor Gajah for the 14km / 9mi remainder of the distance to Tampin.

Map courtesy of Ride With GPS

The cool and overcast conditions had quickly given way to hot and muggy conditions.¬† It was 30¬ļ C / 86¬ļ F at 10.00am.¬† We were relieved to have opted to ride to Tampin rather than Rembau.

We had time for a cold drink after buying our tickets.  The train left on time at 10.55am.  And in only a few minutes we were cold.  The air-conditioning on the KTM Komuter trains is quite chilly.

We warmed up once our damp jerseys had dried out.  By the second half of the journey, we could feel the heat of the sun coming through the train windows.

Photograph courtesy of Jake Sow

The train takes about two hours to get to KL Sentral station.  On the way we messaged Jeff Liew of The Bike Artisans, asking him to book duck rice lunches at the restaurant next door to his bike shop.  We would be riding in that direction to get back to my place from KL Sentral station.

It was an easier task to get out of KL Sentral station that it had been to get into Tampin station, where the lift had broken down.

Photograph courtesy of Mark Lim

We rode the escalator up to the main hall of KL Sentral station and then wheeled our bikes fifty metres to the exit.  In less than a minute we were on Jalan Tun Sambanthan headed towards the Bike Artisans and lunch.

In less than 4.5km / 3mi we were at Jeff’s doorstep.¬† Which was a good thing because it was another hot day.¬†

Kelin joined us for lunch.  

Photograph courtesy of TH Lim

As did TH.

Photograph courtesy of TH Lim

We made short work of the chicken and duck rice.  Thank you Jeff for buying us lunch, and Kelin and TH for joining us.

All that remained was to ride the hot 3km / 2mi to my place.

Photograph courtesy of TH Lim

We had moaned at times about the heat over the two days.  But we did agree that it had been a fun couple of days, and that we looked forward to more such rides.  

And there are already some R@SKLs asking to join the next overnight ride.

To Melaka for the night

Some activities require a lot of planning.  Others happen almost spontaneously.  This trip to Melaka was one of the latter.  The idea was mooted on the 13th.  There were few takers initially.  On the 20th there were four of us interested.

Things sped up from there.  Within a couple of days, hotel rooms were booked and the ride start location and time were agreed.  At 6.15am on Sunday 25th, six of us were starting the 180km / 112 mi ride to Melaka.

Map courtesy of Ride With GPS

Our route took us along the Maju Expressway (MEX) toward Cyberjaya.  It started drizzling as we rode toward MEX.  When we got onto MEX via Jalan Kampung Pandan the expressway was wet but the drizzle had stopped.

Photograph courtesy of Mark Lim
Photograph courtesy of Mark Lim

The roads got progressively wetter as we rode through Cyberjaya and on to Dengkil.  Our touring saddle bags came in very useful as fenders to keep the spray from our rear wheels off our butts and backs.

We had planned to stop at the same roadside roti canai stall where we always have breakfast on rides through Dengkil.  To our surprise, the stall isn’t there anymore.  So we stopped at the closest mamak shop for teh tarik and roti telur.

It was still overcast when we got to Sepang.  70km / 44mi into our ride.  The Shell station at Sepang is a convenient place to stop for a rest room and to raid the convenience store refrigerator.

15 minutes earlier we had ridden through Pekan Salak, where on a previous trip Liang and I had been gouged by the owner of the bike shop there.  If I recall correctly we were charged RM30 / USD7.15 per inner tube.  We had to buy some there because we had both already had flat tires and had used all our spare tubes.

This time none of us had a flat during the entire trip.

The weather changed between Sepang and Lukut.  In less than 20km / 12mi it went from overcast and cool to sunny and hot.  And  very humid too, thanks to the wet roads.

When we got to the Port Dickson Waterfront it was well past 30¬ļ C / 86¬ļ F.  We were looking forward to an ice cold cendol but the stall was closed.  Which seemed odd for 11.15am.  So we moved on to the McDonald’s.  That was open but they had no fountain drinks nor ice.  They had no water supply at all.

So we rode to the nearest 7-Eleven, where we were told that the entire town had been without water since Friday due to the forced shutdown of the Sungai Linggi water treatment plant.  No wonder the cendol stall was closed.  Residents were dependent on tankers to deliver water for cooking and bathing.  The chillers at the 7-Eleven were well stocked and the air-conditioning was running full blast.  It was 35¬ļ C / 95¬ļ F outside.  We cooled down in the 7-Eleven for fifteen minutes.

80km / 50mi to go.  We covered just over 26km / 16mi before we had to stop again to seek respite from the heat.  We had reached the junction with Jalan Pasir Panjang – Kuala Linggi, where we would leave Federal Route 5 and ride along the coast.  There is a stall at the junction selling fresh coconut water. 

Photograph courtesy of Mark Lim

I needed that drink.  We all needed a drink.  We all needed thirty minutes in the shade.

5km / 3mi up the road is the Linggi river which in that neck of the woods forms the border between the states of Negri Sembilan and Melaka.  That sign over Brian’s head reads Selamat Datang ke Melaka (Welcome to Melaka).

Photograph courtesy of Mark Lim

It was about 1.30pm when we crossed the bridge.  We were hungry.  Our planned lunch stop was at Kuala Seafood in Kuala Sungai Baru.  9km / 6mi away.  Despite the heat, we got there in twenty minutes.  It was past the usual lunch hour, but there was still enough food left on the buffet for us to fill our faces.

It was about 40km / 25mi from Kuala Seafood to our hotel in Melaka.  We weren’t going to cover that distance all in one go.  We made another 7-Eleven stop after 7km / 4mi to refill our bottles.  We were going through fluid at a very rapid rate.

Our next stop was at Klebang Original Coconut Shake.  This is a “must-stop” venue for hot and thirsty cyclists.

Photograph courtesy of Mark Lim

I had two of these fresh coconut water and vanilla ice cream concoctions.  And got a brain freeze in the process of sucking down the first one.  Which wasn’t as bad as it sounds, given the heat of the afternoon.

Revived by the coconut shakes we pedalled the last few kilometres to the Euro Rich Hotel.  Once we had stowed our bikes in the storeroom near the front desk, it was time for a shower and a rest.  Six and a half hours in the sun had taken it out of us.  And turned parts of our bodies a few shades darker.

Photograph courtesy of Mark Lim

We met at 7.00pm for dinner.  Earlier we had thought of riding to somewhere to eat, but we nixed that idea.  This had been Jake’s and Martin’s longest ever ride.  They had had enough of riding for one day.

Instead we wandered to Pahlawan Walk.

Photograph courtesy of Mark Lim

I got a mango juice from the stall on the right on the way to dinner, and another one on the way back to the hotel.  I was probably hungry and dehydrated in equal measure.

It was an early night for all of us.  Thank goodness the hotel is in a quiet part of town.  Undisturbed sleep until 6.30am.

Geometric Progression Weekend

Double

We didn’t plan for our ride distances to double everyday, but that is how our three-day weekend turned out.

Day 1

Leslie, Simon, Ridzuwan and I met at the Bank Negara KTM station for the Komuter train ride to Tampin.

Day 1 Bank Negara Arthur

Photograph courtesy of Arthur Ang

As is usually the case, there were only one or two other people with us and our Apidura saddle pack-equipped bicycles in the carriage at the back of the train.

Tampin is the last stop on the Komuter line that starts from Batu Caves, to the north of Kuala Lumpur.

Day 1 Tampin Leslie

Photograph courtesy of Leslie Tong

It took about two hours to get there.  Long enough for an appetite for lunch to develop.  So our first stop was at Restoran Nasi Kandar Impian in Tampin.

The Fenix Inn in Melaka is 40km / 25mi from Tampin.¬† So it wasn’t very long before we were on the outskirts of¬†Melaka.

Day 1 Arriving in Melaka Leslie

Photograph courtesy of Leslie Tong

One of our rooms at the Fenix Inn wasn’t ready when we arrived there.¬† So we did what most people do when in Melaka.¬† We went cendol hunting.

Day 1 Cendol Hunting Leslie

Photograph courtesy of Leslie Tong

We found a shop selling cendol on Lorong Hang Jebat.¬† But the guys spotted Sid’s Pub across the road.¬† Cendol lost out to cold beers and lime juice.

Day 1 Sid's Simon

Photograph courtesy of Simon Soo Hu

While we were on our second round of drinks, the sky darkened and thunder rumbled.  We had had enough of riding in the rain in Southern Thailand, so emptied our glasses and rode back to the hotel.

It didn’t rain.

After a shower and a nap, we gathered for what Arthur described to me as a Melaka tradition.  Satay at 5pm.

Arthur, a Melaka boy, couldn’t ride with us as he had hoped.¬† So he drove to Melaka to act as our guide while we were there.¬† You can’t beat local knowledge.¬† Arthur knows which tourist traps to avoid, and where the hidden gems are.¬† The satay at the restaurant he took us to was excellent.

8.00pm is dinner time in Melaka.  Arthur took us towards Umbai, in search of grilled fish.  We found the Medan Selera MBMB, at the end of  Jalan Alai Perdana 21.  The Medan Selera (food court) houses a number of restaurants, all selling fresh seafood, cooked to order.

Arthur and Simon chose this place.

Day 1 Arthur.png

Simon loaded up a bowl with fresh prawns, cencaru (torpedo scad),¬†pari (stingray), and squid, under Wan’s watchful eye.¬† The prawns and fish were grilled, and the squid was batter-fried.¬† Delicious!

Thank you Arthur for being our food guide, and driving us around Melaka.

Day 1 Umbai Dinner

Day 2

We slept in after all that food the evening before.  At 9.00am Arthur led us to a restaurant that is fabled for its fish ball soup.  Unfortunately the stall owner was on holiday, so we settled for soft-boiled eggs, and toast with kaya.

Then we headed north along Lorong Hajah Maznah toward Port Dickson.

Day 2 Rolling 1 Leslie

Photograph courtesy of Leslie Tong

32km / 20mi later it was time for a drink.  And some roti canai.  We shared two rotis between us.  It was, after all, only 75 minutes since we ate breakfast!

Eight drinks and two rotis for the princely sum of RM10 / USD2.45.¬† You can’t complain.

Day 2 Roti Stop Simon

Photograph courtesy of Simon Soo Hu

At 52km / 32mi we crossed the Sungai Linggi.  Worth a few photographs as the Sungai Linggi at that point forms the border between the states of Melaka and Negeri Sembilan.

Day 2 Border Bridge Leslie

Photograph courtesy of Leslie Tong

Day 2 On the Border Leslie

Photograph courtesy of Leslie Tong

A few kilometers later we saw a sign advertising mango floats.¬† It was 36¬į C / 97¬į F.

We stopped.

Day 2 Mangga Shake

There was a buffet with grilled cencaru and curried ikan parang (wolf herring).  It was as good a time as any for lunch.

At Pasir Panjang I led the guys on a detour from our planned route.  We left Route 5 and rode along Jalan Kampung Sungai Sekawang toward the sea.  It made a nice change to be on a road with no vehicles.

Day 2 Quiet Road

Photograph courtesy of Leslie Tong

Jalan Kampung Sungai Sekawang rejoins Route 5 near the Eagle Ranch Resort.  As the tepees indicate, the theme of this resort is the American West of cowboys and log cabins.

Day 2 Eagle Ranch Leslie

Photograph courtesy of Leslie Tong

By 2.00pm we were on the outskirts of Port Dickson.  We had time to burn before check in time at the Waterfront Boutique Hotel.  I saw a sign for Pantai Purnama.  That seemed a better bet than the beach further along at Teluk Kemang, which was likely to be crowded with weekend holiday makers.

 

This photograph of Purnama beach is misleading.  There was a reunion event going on at the beach.  Just out of shot, there were lots of people on the beach and in the water.

Day 2 Beach

We enjoyed the shade and sea breeze, and our ice cold rose syrup and lime drinks.

Day 2 Beach Stop Leslie

Photograph courtesy of Leslie Tong

Leslie bought eight packets of drinks.  We could only finish one packet each, so we gave the other four packets to the family having a picnic behind us.

40 minutes later we were riding past Teluk Kemang beach.  It did look very crowded.

It was about 85km / 53mi from the Fenix Inn in Melaka to the Waterfront Boutique Hotel in Port Dickson.  Day 1 distance x 2.

Arthur had headed back to KL after guiding us to the Melaka breakfast spot.¬† So we didn’t have access to a car in Port Dickson.¬† Which made the Waterfront Boutique Hotel, located on the boulevard walk, an excellent choice.¬† Within walking distance of the hotel entrance are a variety of food outlets, bars, a bank, a 7-Eleven, etc.

As per Day 1, a shower and nap were the immediate priority after getting our room keys.  Also as per Day 1, we kept up the Melaka tradition of tea at 5pm.

We sat at the Pattaya Bar, and had food delivered from the neighbouring Double Q Thai Cuisine restaurant.  A selection of Thai appetizers, and plates of pad thai.

Dinner followed at 8.00pm.  We walked to the Arab place a bit further along the boulevard.  A family platter of chicken mandi, with an extra serving of lamb, and Turkish coffee and crème caramel for afters.

The one downside of the hotel’s location made itself apparent at about midnight.¬† That is when the pub near the hotel sprang to life.¬† Pounding music and arguments in the car park kept us awake until 3am.¬† Except for Leslie, who brought earplugs.¬† Smart man!

Day 3

Port Dickson to Kuala Lumpur was the longest leg of our trip.  An early start, despite our lack of sleep, was necessary.

We checked out of the hotel at 6.45am, and rolled the 500 meters to the McDonald’s at the end of the boulevard.¬† The jazzy music which accompanied our McMuffins made a cool change from the Hindi-pop of the night before.

Day 3 Breakfast Leslie

Photograph courtesy of Leslie Tong

We were on the road at 7.20am.  Our target was a 9.30am rendezvous at Morib beach with Luanne, Chew, Mark, and Shawn.  They were riding from Kota Kemuning to Morib.  The idea was for us to take a break at Morib, and for them to ride with us from there back to Kota Kemuning.

The highlight of this leg was the ferry ride across the Sungai Sepang.  The ride from Tanah Merah New Village to Pekan Sungai Pelek using the ferry near Kampung India is 7km / 4mi shorter than it would be if we stayed on Route 5 to Pekan Sungai Pelek.

The N4 is a quieter road than Route 5.  The 1km to the ferry is even quieter.

Day 2 Off the Main Road Simon

Photograph courtesy of Leslie Tong

The river at that point is no more than 100 meters wide.  The ferry crossing costs RM0.80 / USD0.20 per person, including the RM0.30 / USD0.07 charge for a bike.

Day 3 Rolling onto the Ferry Simon

Photograph courtesy of Simon Soo Hu

The banks of the Sungai Pelek are lined with mangrove forest.¬† Sadly, one of the Earth’s most rapidly disappearing ecosystems.

Day 3 Mangrove Leslie

Photograph courtesy of Leslie Tong

Back on Route 5 in Pekan Sungai Pelek, we came upon the first road sign indicating the distance to Morib.¬† I had underestimated the distance from Port Dickson to Morib by 30%.¬† I said, with misplaced confidence, “About 50km / 30mi.”¬† It was actually 65km / 40mi.

It was clear we weren’t going to be at Morib beach at 9.30am.¬† We got to Tanjung Sepat at 9.00am, and needed a break.¬† We stopped at a roadside food stall for tea, coffee, and¬†you char koay¬†(deep-fried strips of dough).

The four we were going to meet at Morib beach had arrived there at 9.00am.  They were already tucking into their nasi lemak as we were ordering our coffee etc. at Tanjung Sepat.

Day 3 Morib Group Luanne

Photograph courtesy of Luanne Sieh

Morib beach is 18km / 11mi from Tanjung Sepat.  I sent Mark our live location via WhatsApp.  (That is such a cool WhatsApp feature).  Simon messaged Mark, suggesting that he and the others start riding and meet us on our way to Morib.

Which is what they did.  We crossed paths about 5km / 3mi south of Morib beach.  By then the Port Dickson crew were ready for another pit stop.  The Delicious Bread Café in Morib was our first choice, but it was closed.

So we rode a further 10km / 6mi to Restoran Madam Kopi-O in Banting.

Day 3 Banting Stop Leslie

Photograph courtesy of Leslie Tong

From there it was on familiar roads to Kampung Seri Cheeding, Bandar Rimbayu, and Restoran BR Maju in Kota Kemuning.

Day 3 Morib to Kota Kemuning Leslie

Photograph courtesy of Leslie Tong

The Morib four were done for the day.  Kudos to Shawn, who rode almost 100km / 62mi Рhis longest ride by some 60km / 37mi.

Simon and Leslie decided to call it a day as well.¬† They accepted Luanne’s and Mark’s offers of a lift home.¬† Wan and I had a relatively flat ride to get to Jalan Ampang, so we decided to ride on.

22km / 14mi later, we wondered if we had made a mistake.¬† It had been more overcast than sunny all morning, but by the time we got to the Kinrara R&R it was 35¬į C / 95¬į F and bright.

The die had been cast though.  We each downed an iced 100 Plus, and headed back out onto the KESAS motorcycle lane.

Fortunately for us, the clouds rolled in again, and we didn’t get roasted alive during the following 20km / 12.5mi to Mak Jah Corner in Ampang Jaya.¬† Which is just down the road from where Wan lives.

Mak Jah Corner is noted for its Malay kuih.  These were delicious.  I had two more iced teas in quick succession before saying goodbye to Wan and heading home.

Day 3 Kuih

I ended up riding 163km / 101mi.  Day 2 distance x 2.

The four of us had an excellent weekend.  Helped in no small way by Arthur being with us in Melaka, and Luanne, Chew, Mark and Shawn joining us in Morib.

We had dry and generally cool weather over the three days.  And no punctures or other mechanical issues enroute.  And lots of tasty food, good company, and laughter.

Route

Map courtesy of Ride With GPS

We are already thinking about where to tour next.

Avillion Coastal Ride 2017

Banner 3

Graphic courtesy of Avillion Coastal Ride 2017

I lived in Port Dickson (PD) for a couple of years.  For many years after my family moved away, PD was a regular day trip destination.  The Si Rusa Inn, with its restaurant and bar open on all sides to the sea breeze, outdoor jukebox, and kampung ladies sitting under the casuarina trees, weaving and selling mengkuang hats, bags, and mats, was a favourite place to spend a Sunday.

That was forty years ago.  The Si Rusa Inn is now derelict.  PD has become crowded with resorts and hotels.  The beaches are not what they used to be.  I stopped going to PD for beach holidays.

PD pdwaterfront com my

Photograph courtesy of pdwaterfront.com.my

In the last few years it has instead become a cycling destination for me.  See BCG Tour Klang РPort Dickson РKlang and Chinese New Year 2017 Tour.

The Avillion Coastal Ride (ACR) has been hosted by PD for a number of years.¬† I made up for missing the previous ACRs by turning this year’s ACR into a three-day cycling event.¬† Kota Kemuning to Morib with the R@SKLs, and then solo to PD on Saturday.¬† The 160km Endurance ACR with friends on Sunday.¬† And a solo ride home on Monday.

You can tell by the way the pre-ride formalities are managed that an event is run by a competent organiser.  In this case Pedal Explorer and their technical director, Encik Zulkarnain Shah, seen here keeping an eye on the goody bag distribution.

Organiser

Information about the ride was clearly posted outside the room where participants were to collect their goody bags.

IMG_4386

The distribution of ride packs / goody bags was efficiently managed.   I was out of the room, three goody bags in hand, in a matter of minutes.

Those goody bags were heavier than I expected.  That 500g pack of organic rice was an unusual goody bag item.

Goody Bag Mohd Farid Abu Bakar

Photograph courtesy of Mohd Farid Abu Bakar

Registration for the ACR 2017 entitled participants to a discounted rate at the host hotels.  Either the Avillion Admiral Cove, or the Avillion PD.  I had opted for the latter.  So I had a 4.5km / 2.8 ride from the goody bag pickup at Avillion Admiral Cove to the Avillion PD.  With goody bags swinging from my handlebar.

I had been in my cycling kit for more than eight hours. The first thing I needed after checking in to my water chalet was a shower.  I stood fully-clothed under the high-volume shower head, rinsing salt and grime off body and out of kit.

Avillion PD¬†I hadn’t eaten anything since stopping at Morib with the R@SKLs.¬† I had a late lunch in the Crow’s Nest restaurant, with a view of the Straits of Malacca.

 

Avillion PD 2

Marco, Mark, and Martin drove from KL to PD early on Sunday morning.  I met them at the Avillion PD car park, and we rode to the start line at the Avillion Admiral Cove.

Here we are, waiting for the ride to be flagged off.

Four Musketeers Mark

Photograph courtesy of Mark Lim

There were lots of cycling clubs and teams, resplendent in their matching kits.  Including this group of former students from my secondary school.

SJI Avillion Coastal Ride

Photograph courtesy of Avillion Coastal Ride 2017

There were three distances to choose from.  The 25km / 15.5mi Fun Ride, the 90km / 56mi Scenic Ride, and the 160km / 99.5mi Endurance Ride.

The Endurance Ride participants set off first.¬† Led out by three riders on postman’s bikes.¬† The national courier, Pos Laju, was the main sponsor of the ACR 2017.

Pos Laju leadout

Photograph courtesy of Cycling Malaysia magazine

1,606 participants streamed under the Start / Finish arch.  Including two riders on unusual machines.

Recumbent 2 Avillion Coastal Ride

Photograph courtesy of Avillion Coastal Ride 2017

Elliptigo Marco

Photograph courtesy of Cycling Malaysia magazine

The Endurance Ride route took us south past the old Si Rusa Inn, and then eastward.  Within ten minutes the four of us had latched on to the rear of a fairly large group.  Which included this gentleman on a fat bike.

Fat Bike Avillion Coastal Ride

Photograph courtesy of Avillion Coastal Ride 2017

He, and the others ahead of us, provided a draft which we enjoyed all the way to the first water station at Linggi.  Almost everyone in the group stopped there.  We rode through that water station, so we became a peloton of four.

Route

Map courtesy of Avillion Coastal Ride 2017

At about the 40km / 25mi mark we crossed the border between the state of Negri Sembilan and the state of Melaka, at Lubok China.  We were enjoying the very pleasant roads between the small towns and villages.

In the country Avillion Coastal Ride

Photograph courtesy of Avillion Coastal Ride 2017

There wasn’t much traffic on those roads.¬† Not that traffic would have been a problem.¬† We were accompanied by a capable set of marshalls on motorbikes, who shielded us from any vehicles.

Outrider Marco

Photograph courtesy of Marco Lai

There were also mechanics on motorbikes and scooters.  More than a few participants were very grateful for the roadside assistance they received.

Flat Repair Avillion Coastal Ride

Photograph courtesy of Avillion Coastal Ride 2017

The mobile marshalls were complementd by marshalls positioned at intersections.  They stopped traffic so that we could keep rolling.  The ever-present marshalls are another hallmark of a well-organised event.

Marshall 3 Avillion Coastal Ride

Photograph courtesy of Avillion Coastal Ride 2017

It takes considerable resources to efficiently and effectively manage a cycling event.  In the case of the ACR 2017, this included 300 support crew, officials and volunteers, 3 ambulances, 3 broom lorries, 7 support vehicles, 6 police patrol cars and 60 police motorbikes and pilots.

Kudos to Pedal Explorer, Encik Zulkarnain Shah, the police personnel, and the support crew, officials and volunteers for making the ACR 2017 a safe and memorable event for all the participants.

3km / 1.8mi after crossing the state border, we became a group of three.  Martin did the Scenic Ride.  His route split from ours at the junction of Federal Route 5 and State Route M140.

90km Route

Map courtesy of Avillion Coastal Ride 2017

We waved goodbye as Martin turned right.  By then, Marco and Mark had been ready for breakfast for some time.  I had had the benefit of a room service breakfast, albeit at the ungodly hour of 4.40am.  (My breakfast was delivered twenty minutes early).

My companions were on the road while I was eating my pancakes, so they were hungry.  We stopped at a food stall in Kampung Jeram, about 50km / 31mi into the ride.

Nasi lemak and iced Milo sorted out the hunger pangs.

Breakfast Marco

Photograph courtesy of Marco Lai

Having only recently fed and watered ourselves, we rolled through the next water station at 72km / 45mi.  We missed out on the dabbing action there!

Water Stop ACR

Photograph courtesy of Avillion Coastal Ride 2017

Halfway through the ride we were on the AMJ Highway.  The clouds had burned off, and the temperature was rising.  Our thoughts turned to the ice cold coconut shakes at Klebang Original Coconut Shake.  5km / 3mi away.

All the turns along the route were very clearly marked with red arrows.  Even at junctions without a marshall, it was obvious which way to turn.  We got to Jalan Klebang Besar / Klebang Kecil and turned right, as indicated by the red arrow.

We started looking for Klebang Original Coconut Shake.  2km / 1.2mi later we were riding out of Klebang Besar, without having seen the coconut shake shop.  One look at our route on Strava revealed why.  Klebang Original Coconut Shake is 200 meters / 660 feet to the left of the junction where we had turned right.  So close!

Klebang Shake

Map courtesy of Strava and Google Maps

A couple of kilometers later we turned left onto Jalan Pekan Tanjung 2.  And found a sundry shop with cold drinks and a tap where we could wash our faces.  We spent fifteen minutes there, sitting inside the shop, under a fan, cold drinks in hand.

We had met up with Johan S. a number of times along the route.  He would pass us on the downhills, and we would pass him on the uphills and flats.

IMG_4396

Photograph courtesy of Avillion Coastal Ride 2017

We spotted him as he rode past the sundry shop.  A quick yell, and he was soon resting in the shop with us.

Our next destination was Kuala Seafood at Kuala Sungai Baru, 25km / 15.5mi away.¬† This is the restaurant which was closed, to our great disappointment, when we rode to Melaka about a month ago.¬† I was certain that the restaurant was along our route, so we wouldn’t miss it the way we had missed Klebang Original Coconut Shake..

Kuala Seafood

Kuala Seafood was open!  A waitress told us that the restaurant had closed for a month so that the staff could have a long holiday.  It had been re-opened for two days.  I told her that the next time they plan to close for a month, they need to put an announcement about it in the newspapers.

It was 12.30pm when we got to Kuala Seafood.¬† It was at least 35¬į C / 95¬į F.¬† We were shoes-off hot.

Hot Feet Marco

Photograph courtesy of Marco Lai

The food looked delicious, as we expected.  But we were too hot to eat any of it.  All we wanted were ice-cold drinks.

At that point we had about 35km / 22mi left to ride.  We were back on familiar roads between PD and Melaka.  We had cycled before on these roads at about the same time of day, so we knew it was going to get hotter over the next hour or two.  The number of people we saw taking a break in whatever shade they could find bore this out.

In the Shade 2 Avillion Coastal Ride

Photograph courtesy of Avillion Coastal Ride 2017

The last 12km / 7.5mi of the ride included a 10.5km / 6.5mi stretch of Jalan Pintasan Teluk Kemang.  That road is a dual carriageway that serves as an inland shortcut to the Seremban РPort Dickson Highway.  It bypasses the narrow, winding two-way road which runs along the coast.

It was probably 37¬į C / 99¬į F, if not hotter, on that bypass.¬† There is no shade.¬† And it rolls up and down over its entire length, to the tune of 162 meters / 530 feet of climbing.

Bypass

Photograph courtesy of Cycling Malaysia magazine

It was too hot to linger.  So we upped the pace, helped by a tailwind, to the finish at the Avillion Admiral Cove.

Because we had lingered over food and drinks along the way, we were amongst the last finishers.  Well behind all the Fun and Scenic Ride participants, and most of the Endurance riders.

So we didn’t get any of watermelon or iced Milo on offer at the end of the ride.¬† It had all been polished off by the cyclists ahead of us.¬† I’m looking at you Martin!

There were plenty of packs of biryani rice, chicken, and cabbage left.¬† It was pretty good too.¬† Some of the better post-ride food I’ve tasted.¬† There was lots of water, and chocolate muffins as well.¬† We didn’t really have to eat our medals..

Sweet Marco

After we ate and cooled down, we rode back to the Avillion Hotel PD for a shower and a change of clothes.  We had one more place to visit.

Azmi Chendol Marco

Photograph courtesy of Marco Lai

A bowl of Azmi chendol was an excellent end to the ACR 2017.

I’m looking forward to the ACR 2018.

Medal Mark

Photograph courtesy of Mark Lim

Eating Our Way to Melaka

Melaka Banner Johan Sopiee

Graphic courtesy of Johan Sopiee

Mark and I decided that it was high time to break out the Apidura saddle bags and go on an overnight bicycle trip.  We chose Melaka as our destination, because it is a reasonable distance from Kuala Lumpur, the roads are generally good, and the eating along the way and in Melaka is excellent.

After some canvassing, we had a group of six.  Alan and Chee Seng could not stay overnight, so their plan was to ride to Melaka, and then get to Tampin KTM station for the train back to KL.  Johan S., Ridzuwan, Mark and I would spend Thursday night in Melaka.

We were all excited about the trip.  Bikes and saddle bags were set up the day before, and some of us struggled to get to sleep the night before.

We started from where I live. ¬†We were on the MEX Highway by about 6.15am. ¬†The adrenaline levels are a bit high when riding on MEX. ¬†It is a highway after all. ¬†Though at that early hour, there isn’t much traffic leaving KL, so the riding is not too fraught.

We made a quick pit stop at the Seri Kembangan R&R.

Melaka MEX R&R Alan

Photograph courtesy of Alan Tan

As expected, given the wet weather of the preceding days, we got rained on as we left the R&R. ¬†Fortunately the rain wasn’t heavy, and it didn’t last long. ¬†We did have wet roads until we reached Dengkil. ¬†A benefit of the Apidura saddle bag is that it extends back far enough to block the spray coming off the rear wheel. ¬†It is like riding with a rear mud guard.

Dengkil was where our first planned food stop.  There is a roadside stall on the corner of Jalan Aman and Jalan Mutiara 1J.  We stop there for breakfast whenever our rides take us through Dengkil.

Melaka Dengkil Mark

Photograph courtesy of Mark Lim

We had a visitor looking for handouts during breakfast.

Melaka Dengkil Cat Mark Lim

Photograph courtesy of Mark Lim

From the Dengkil bypass we rode along the busy Putrajaya‚ÄďCyberjaya Expressway and the Nilai – KLIA Highway before turning right onto the quieter Jalan Besar Salak at Salak Tinggi.

Melaka Rolling Johan sopiee

Photograph courtesy of Johan Sopiee

Our next stop was at the Shell station in Sepang.  70km / 43.5mi done.  110km / 68mi to go.  It was supposed to be a short stop for drinks and the loo, but soon after this picture was taken . . .

Melaka Sepang Mark Lim

Photograph courtesy of Mark Lim

this picture was taken.

Melaka Flat 1 Mark Lim

Photograph courtesy of Mark Lim

My front tire had gone soft while we were at the Shell station.  This was the culprit.

Melaka Flat 2 Alan Tan

Photograph courtesy of Alan Tan

An advantage of Two-Way Fit‚ĄĘ rims is that the tire bead stays locked to the rim after a puncture. ¬†A flat tire doesn’t roll off the rim. ¬†A very useful quality when you get a flat while speeding down a winding descent.

The associated disadvantage of 2-Way Fit‚ĄĘ rims is that it is difficult to get the tire off the rim, and even more difficult to seat the tire properly when reinflating the tube. ¬†Thank goodness for the air pump at the petrol station, which generated enough air pressure to quickly seat the tire.

Happy smiles as we finally got going again.

Melaka Sepang Rolling Johan Sopiee

Photograph courtesy of Johan Sopiee

We rode out of the Shell station onto Federal Route 5, which runs along the west side of Peninsular Malaysia, from Skudai in the south to Ipoh in the north.

Our intermediate destination was Cendol Azmi in Port Dickson.  Which serves some of the best cendol I have ever had.  Mark and I have been there a number of times.  We talked up Cendol Azmi over the 25km / 15.5mi to Port Dickson.

So imagine our collective disappointment when we go to Cendol Azmi and found it closed.  What a letdown!

We settled on Sukand’s Food Station, across the road from Cendol Azmi.

Melaka Port Dickson 1 Chee Seng

Photograph courtesy of Lee Chee Seng

To Sukand’s credit, their cendol was pretty good. ¬†As was the three-layer air bandung.

We debated having lunch in Port Dickson, but decided to hold out until we got to Kuala Sungai Baru, across the state border in Melaka.  Mark and I had eaten at Kuala Seafood during previous cycling trips to Melaka.  That restaurant was a highlight every time.

We stopped to buy Cokes at Pasir Panjang, about halfway between Port Dickson and Kuala Sungai Baru.  We then picked up the pace over the 20km to Kuala Seafood.  2pm had come and gone, and we were hungry.

So imagine our extreme disappointment when we got to Kuala Seafood and found it closed.  What a bummer!!

There weren’t many options for food. ¬†The few restaurants in the vicinity had sold out of their lunch offerings. ¬†We settled for some mediocre fried rice, just to fill out stomachs more than anything else.

We had 40km / 25mi to go to Melaka.  Alan had been talking about getting coconut shakes once we got there.  Melaka is known for good coconut shakes.  Alan said that Klebang Original Coconut Shake was the place.  Having been disappointed twice already, we made Alan call Klebang Original Coconut Shake to make sure that it was open.

It was.

Melaka Coconut Shake 1 Mark Lim

Photograph courtesy of Mark Lim

And the coconut shakes were good.  Good enough for us to drink a second round of shakes.

Melaka Coconut Shake 2 Mark Lim

Photograph courtesy of Mark Lim

This place is worth visiting again.

Melaka Coconut Shake 3 Mark Lim

Photograph courtesy of Mark Lim

By the time we left Klebang Original Coconut Shake, my patched inner tube was failing.  I gave it a good pump up, and Johan S., Mark, Ridzuwan and I headed to our hotel.

Alan and Chee Seng were heading back to KL that evening.  They first rode to Jonker Walk and Dutch Square for obligatory tourist photographs.

Melaka Alan & Chee Seng 1 Lee Chee Seng

Photograph courtesy of Lee Chee Seng

And a refreshing recovery beverage.

Melaka Alan & Chee Seng 2 Lee Chee Seng

Photograph courtesy of Lee Chee Seng

The rest of us checked in to the Hallmark Crown Hotel.  I had booked the hotel sight unseen.  Welcome to the Internet Age!  The price was right Рabout USD25 per night for a double occupancy room, including buffet breakfast.

We weren’t expecting much, but were pleasantly surprised when we got to our rooms. ¬†Which were clean and comfortable, and had air-conditioning and a mini-fridge which worked. ¬†Plus there was lots of hot water on the shower, and the free wifi signal was strong.

Showered and changed, we walked to the next food destination on our list.  The Makko Nyonya Restaurant.  Another repeat visit venue for Mark and I.  Fortunately for the two of us, Makko was open!

Fried eggplant with chilli, beancurd skin rolls, cincalok omelette, chicken rendang, curry prawns with pineapple, and chendol.

The 180km / 112mi bike ride was worth it for this meal alone.

While we were stuffing our faces at dinner, Alan and Chee Seng had made it to Tampin, and were on the KTM Komuter train back to KL.  Comfortably so.

Melaka Train Alan Lee Chee Seng

Photograph courtesy of Lee Chee Seng

Not to be outdone in the food stakes, Alan and Chee Seng had supper in KL.

On Friday morning the four of us attacked the hotel buffet breakfast. ¬†An observer would have thought that we hadn’t eaten at all the night before!

Then it was out turn for tourist photographs.

Melaka Tourist 3 Johan Sopiee

Photograph courtesy of Johan Sopiee

Melaka Tourist 2 Mark Lim

Photograph courtesy of Mark Lim

We had, briefly, considered cycling back to KL.  Riding to Tampin and taking the train seemed like a more reasonable thing to do.

Melaka Lebuhraya AMH Johan Sopiee

Photograph courtesy of Johan Sopiee

40km / 25mi of pedalling got us to the Pulau Sebang (Tampin) KTM station.

Melaka Tampin 3 Mark Lim

Photograph courtesy of Mark Lim

We loaded our bikes and ourselves into the last carriage of the train.

Two and a bit hours later, we were at the Bank Negara KTM station in KL.  It is a short ride from there to where I live.

It was lunch time, so we made a side trip first, to Santa Chapati House on Jalan Sarikei.  A fitting end to our two-day adventure.  It was, after all, an eating trip with some cycling thrown in for variety.

Melaka Santa 1 Mark Lim

Photograph courtesy of Mark Lim

Thank you Alan, Chee Seng, Johan S., Ridzuwan and Mark for your enjoyable company.  We had a lot of laughs and good riding.  To be repeated for sure.

Footnote

The graphic at the top of this post is a mashup of our coconut shakes and the logo for a anti-littering campaign which was launched by the Melaka state government in 2014. ¬†A take on the¬†‚ÄúDon‚Äôt Mess With Texas‚ÄĚ campaign started there in 1986.