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Grow Your Jersey Collection One Ride at a Time – 2017

This is my fifh annual gallery of jerseys and T-shirts that were given out by event organisers.

You can look at previous year’s galleries here:





The first event jersey for 2017 was from the CIMB Cycle @ Seri Menanti ride.  Remembered most for the evil 1km / 0.6mi, 9% average gradient climb within sight of the finish.


April saw the 10th running of one of my favourite events, the Janamanjung Fellowship Ride.  Always well-organized, and always fun.  This event give out T shirts of registered participants.


The next month brought the NST C-Cycle Challenge.  We got rained on, hard, during that ride.

I gave away the event jersey, so have this mock up rather than a photograph.


Another event that is a regular fixture on my calendar is the Campaign for a Lane ride in Penang.  The R@SKLs turn CFAL into a weekend adventure.


I didn’t ride in many organized events this year.  Quality over quantity.  The Satun International Century Ride certainly had quality.  Despite the low turnout, the organisers looked after the participants very well.

This event has given both jerseys and T shirts to riders in the past.  This year we got T shirts only.  I suspect the low number of participants necessitated a budget cut.


As in previous years, I offered these jerseys and T shirts to any of my friends who want them.  A new rider snapped them up.  Perfect!

Grow Your Jersey Collection One Ride at a Time – 2016

This is my fourth annual gallery of jerseys and T-shirts that were given out by event organisers.

You can look at previous year’s galleries here:




The first event jersey for 2016 was collected in April at the BP MS150.  This is normally a  two-day 150mi / 241km charity ride from Houston to Austin.  In 2016 inclement weather forced the organisers to reduce the ride to one day.  I was a part of the team representing Hess Corporation, a company I worked for from 2006 to 2010.

I don’t have the 2016 Hess jersey.  I must have left it in Houston.  Here are my friends and I, in what is one of the better Hess jersey designs that we have worn over the years.


The RHB Shimano Highway Ride LEKAS was at the end of April.  The unique thing about that event was that it was held at night, on a closed highway, under LED street lights.


Next was the Perak Century Ride in May.  I didn’t know the significance of the bull that featured prominently on the event jersey was.  Reader Hanafiah Aris pointed out that it is not a bull, but a seladang, or gaur in English.  Hanafiah also reminded me that the Perak  state soccer team is nicknamed the Seladang.


I have a jersey from the Klang Premiere Century Ride that was held in July.  I didn’t ride in that event though.  I opted to do the two-day BCG Tour from Klang to Port Dickson and back, which happened on the same weekend, instead.


The next event jersey that I “earned” was from the Campaign For A Lane ride in Penang, at the end of August.  For the first time the organisers required participants to wear the event jersey during the ride.  If not riders would not get support at the water stops and at the finish.


Participants got a finisher’s T-shirt as well.


The Putrajaya Century Ride was held on the first weekend in September.  This was one of the more elegant jersey designs of the year.


The last organised ride with swag was the Satun International Century at the end of November.  It was a rather subdued affair because Thailand was in mourning following the passing of King Bhumibol Adulyej.


There was a T-shirt for that event too.  The design was very much like the event jersey.


As I have done in previous years, I will offer these jerseys to anyone who wants one.  Better that they are worn regularly by others, rather than sitting at the back of my closet.

I wonder what event jerseys 2017 will bring.

Southern Thailand Tour Day 1


Almost exactly three years ago, I did my first bike ride ride in Thailand.  The excellent Samila Century Ride 2013.  Since then my friends and I have occasionally discussed doing another ride in Thailand.  Nothing came of those chats until the Perlis Bike Ride 2016 was cancelled due to lack of interest.

The Perlis Bike Ride had been scheduled on the same weekend as the Satun International Century Ride Thailand 2016.  I had opted for the Perlis ride as Perlis is the only state in Peninsular Malaysia where I have yet to ride.

With the Perlis ride off the calendar, Leslie suggested that we do the Satun ride instead.  And to make the long drive to Satun even more worthwhile, he suggested we take a few days to ride around in southern Thailand.

That sounded like a good idea to Lay, Marco, Philip and I.  As Leslie had already done a few bike tours around Thailand, he volunteered to map out a route and itinerary for us.

The five of us met at the Sungai Buloh R&R area at 6.00am.  Leslie, Marco and Philip in one vehicle, and Lay and I in another.  We had 490km / 304mi to drive to the border town of Padang Besar.


Photograph courtesy of Marco Lai

The only concern we had about the entire trip was where to park our cars in Padang Besar.  Our worries about leaving our vehicles unattended for three nights were put to rest when the sergeant at the Padang Besar Police Station let us park inside the station compound.

With parking sorted out, we get ready to ride.


Photograph courtesy of Leslie Tong

The Padang Besar Police Station was the official start and end point for our four-day tour of southern Thailand.


Photograph courtesy of Leslie Tong

We rode from  Padang Besar to Satun.


Photograph courtesy of Leslie Tong

The most convenient border crossing between the two towns is at Wang Kelian.  The road to Wang Kelian and beyond bisects a ridge of hills between Padang Besar and Satun.


The switchbacks were a significant challenge.


Photograph courtesy of Marco Lai


Photograph courtesy of Leslie Tong


Graphic courtesy of veloviewer

Like the rest of us, Lay was glad to get to the top after more than 200 meters / 760 feet of climbing over 2.5km / 1.5mi.


Photograph courtesy of Leslie Tong

Just as we were about to negotiate the switchbacks down to Kampung Wang Kelian, the sky suddenly darkened and it started to pour.  It rained so hard that water was streaming down the road.  The risk of skidding was high, even at low speeds.  Keeping my speed low was difficult because my brakes were getting very little grip on my alloy rims.  Philip had so little braking on his carbon rims that he had to walk his bike down the steeper sections.  It was a sketchy descent for all of us.

We waited out the rain in a small sundry shop in Kampung Wang Kelian.


Photograph courtesy of Leslie Tong

The rain was torrential for about fifteen minutes.  Just as suddenly as it had started, the rain stopped.

(I’ll write a review of our waterproof Apidura saddle packs.  Suffice to say here that our belongings stayed bone dry, despite the deluge.)


Photograph courtesy of Leslie Tong

4km / 2.5mi down the road is the Thai-Malaysian border.


Photograph courtesy of Leslie Tong

Immigration formalities didn’t take long.  Then we were back on our bikes for the 14km / 8.5mi ride down through the valley before reversing direction and riding south to Satun.


Photograph courtesy of Leslie Tong

We had to be at the Satun City Hall by 5.30pm.  The program for the Satun International Century Ride included a pre-ride dinner and remembrance ceremony for the late King Bhumibol Adulyadej.  We didn’t want to be late.

The first order of business was to say hello to Khun Metharin.  She had organised the Samila Century Ride in 2013, and together with Wesee Sport, was the organiser for the Satun ride.


Photograph courtesy of Marco Lai

Also in the photograph are the emcee for the event, and a news cameraman.  The three of them conspired to get me to do a recorded interview about where Team Flipside was from, how we felt about participating in the Satun ride, and to share my thoughts about the passing of Thailand’s revered and beloved king.


Photograph courtesy of WeSee Sport

Then it was dinner time.  The start of four days of good eating in Thailand!

The evening ended with some speeches by officials from Satun Province, followed by 89 seconds of silence and a remembrance ceremony for the late King Bhumibol.


Photograph courtesy of Leslie Tong

We gathered up our goodie bags, turned on our bike lights, and wove our way through an unexpected night market on our way to the SinKiat Buri Hotel.  Our home for the next two nights.

It had been a very early start to the day.  And there were many kilometers to ride the next day.  Time for me to call it a night.