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Tag Archives: Langat River

Tanjung Sepat x 2

Tanjung Sepat View 1

Rides from Kota Kemuning to Morib and back have formed the basis for a number of my posts.

September 2016
March 2017
June 2017
July 2017
March 2018

Rides to Morib and back are about 100km / 62mi long.  Long enough that we don’t venture further down the coast unless the destination is Port Dickson or Melaka.

Tanjung Sepat is a fishing town about 18km / 11mi down the coast from Morib.  Tanjung means cape, and Sepat is a type of fish.  This is one of the towns that we ride through on those longer rides.

March 2014
August 2016
December 2017

Lately, Tanjung Sepat has become a destination in its own right.  I first rode inner roads to Tanjung Sepat with Lay in June.  We returned via the coastal road through Morib.  In July Mark led a group of R@SKLs on a Morib ride extension to Tanjung Sepat.  Last Saturday Mark and I rode to Tanjung Sepat entirely on inner roads, bypassing Morib completely.

The photographs Mark posted led to some R@SKLs asking if Mark and I would lead a duplicate ride the next day.  Which we did.  Hence Tanjung Sepat x 2 for Mark and I.

The long-standing start point for rides to the coast has been Restoran BR Maju in Kota Kemuning.  Since that ride with Lay, I have started from the Bandar Rimbayu Show Gallery instead.  That cuts out 8km / 5mi of road made dusty and sandy, or muddy, depending upon the weather, by legions of earth-moving lorries.

The other R@SKLs have bought into the new starting point too.

Tanjung Sepat Route

These are the photographs that prompted other R@SKLs to want to do this ride also.  Lovely quiet country roads.

Tanjung Sepat Road 2 Mark

Photograph courtesy of Mark Lim

Tanjung Sepat Road 1 Mark

Photograph courtesy of Mark Lim

So eleven of us fired up our lights and rolled out of the Bandar Rimbayu Show Gallery carpark at 6am on Sunday.

The run to the bridge over the Langat River is the same one we always use.  The only mechanical issue o the day came at the apex of the bridge, where Annie dropped her chain.

Tanjung Sepat Dropped Chain Annie Lim

Photograph courtesy of Annie Lim

The new route I plotted kicks in about 1.5km / 1mi from the river, where we turned right off Jalan Pusara onto the much quieter Jalan Kampung Sawah.

Different day, same conditions.

Tanjung Sepat Road 2 Mark Lim

Photograph courtesy of Mark Lim

Happy faces!

Tanjung Sepat TH Wee Giap

Photograph courtesy of Chew Wee Giap

Tanjung Sepat Mark and Martin Mark Lim

Photograph courtesy of Mark Lim

Tanjung Sepat Kiam Woon Wee Giap

Photograph courtesy of Chew Wee Giap

Tanjung Sepat via these inner rural roads is 65km / 40mi from Bandar Rimbayu.  Everyone was hungry when we got there.  The first stop was for breakfast.

Tanjung Sepat Breakast Alfred Chan

Photograph courtesy of Alfred Chan

By some accounts, Tanjung Sepat’s fishing fortunes are in decline as the sea in that part of the Straits of Melaka gets increasingly polluted.  It retains its reputation for good seafood restaurants, of which there are many.  It is also developing other attractions.

A wooden jetty known as Lover’s Bridge collapsed some years ago and has been replaced by a concrete pier.  It is not a particularly romantic structure, but it is worth going out to the end for a photograph.

Tanjung Sepat Pier Group Mark Lim

Photograph courtesy of Mark Lim

You also get a ride track 350 metres / 1,150 feet out into the Straits of Melaka.

Tanjung Sepat Pier

Map courtesy of Ride With GPS

Some enterprising locals have also built a series of Instagrammable structures out of old wine barrels.  Quite a tourist pull on weekends.  This dragon, for instance.

Tanjung Sepat Dragon Mark

Photograph courtesy of Mark Lim

And this bridge between two towers of wine barrels.

Tanjung Sepat Bike Bridge Mark Lim

Photograph courtesy of Mark Lim

There is something for all ages!

Tanjung Sepat Giraffes Mark Lim

Photograph courtesy of Mark Lim

A longer-standing attraction is the Hai Yew Heng pau (stuffed buns) shop.  Famous for over forty years for its traditional home-made Hainanese steamed buns.  The buns sell like hot cakes (pardon the mixed metaphor).  I’ve been through Tanjung Sepat three or four times, and this was the first time the shop was open.  There is no seating in the pau shop, so we sat in the coffee shop across the road

Tanjung Sepat Pau Annie Lim

Photograph courtesy of Annie Lim

We rode back to Bandar Rimbayu was under mostly overcast skies.

Tanjung Sepat Sky Mark Lim

Photograph courtesy of Mark Lim

We made our customary cendol stop after we re-crossed the Langat River.  It made a difference having 8km / 5mi less to ride to get from the cendol stall to the carpark.  I think the Bandar Rimbayu starts are here to stay.

R@SKLs Revisit Morib

R@SKLs Morib Sign Lee Heng Keng.png

After last weekend’s ascent of Fraser’s Hill, the R@SKLs opted for a route where the only climbing required was over the bridge across the South Klang Valley Expressway (SKVE), and over the bridge across the Langat River.

Well, that was the plan.  A plan that was later amended – see below.

Alfred wins the prize again for being the most eager R@SKL.  He was at our starting point, Restoran BR Maju, at 6.15am.

R@SKLs Morib BR Maju Alfred Chan

Photograph courtesy of Alfred Chan

By the appointed start time of 7.15am, we had a peloton of twenty five.

R@SKLS Morib Start 2 KK Yee

Photograph courtesy of KK Yee

The day had started out wet in many parts of KL.  The rain had already passed over Kota Kemuning, so we had cool and dry conditions.  22°C / 72°F at the start.

R@SKLs Morning Tomoe Suga

Photograph courtesy of Tomoe Suga

It took a while for the group to get organized on the road.  We regrouped after crossing the SKVE.

R@SKLs Morib First Stop Tomoe Suga

Photograph courtesy of Tomoe Suga

Then it was onto the very pleasant backroads through Kampung Seri Cheeding.

R@SKLs Morib On The Road 2 KK

Photograph courtesy of KK Yee

R@SKLs Morib On The Road 1 KK

Photograph courtesy of KK Yee

As you would expect of a group of twenty five, we soon split into smaller groups.  Namely the insane and very fast, the slightly mad and moderately fast, and the mentally balanced and reasonably paced.

So it was no surprise that there were time gaps between the groups as we arrived in Morib.

R@SKLS Morib Arriving KK Yee

Photograph courtesy of KK Yee

We all got there safely though.

R@SKLs Morib Sign 1 Daniel Lim

Photograph courtesy of Daniel Lim

Top of mind for everyone was food and drink.  This being the fasting month, all the stalls at the beachside food court were closed.  So we went to the small food shop across the road and next to a temple.

R@SKLs Morib Breakfast 2 Hsing C Pai

Photograph courtesy of Hsing C Pai

R@SKLs Morib Breakfast 1 Hsing C Pai

Photograph courtesy of Hsing C Pai

It was still relatively cool when we got going again forty minutes later.  27°C / 81°F.  We were blessed with very nice cycling weather.

10km / 6mi later we were at the T-junction with Jalan Bukit Jugra.  There are two lighthouses on Bukit Jugra:  a colonial era tower, and a shorter  25 metre concrete tower built in 1976, with lighting systems to facilitate navigation in the Straits of Melaka.  The lighthouses stand out in clear relief against the sky.

R@SKLs Morib Jugra Lighthouse From Far Tomoe Suga

Photograph courtesy of Tomoe Suga

Every ride to Morib elicits the question “Shall we do the Jugra climb?”

It is 1km / 0.6mi from the base of the hill to the lighthouses.  Including the not insignificant matter of 109 meters / 358 feet of elevation.  It is a climb with gradients that hit 20% in places.

Hence, the answer to the question above is invariably “no,” and we turn right at the T-junction, away from the hill.

This time we turned left at the T-junction.  Initially as a joke.  Having ridden the 1.5km / 1mi to the base of the hill, some decided that, since they were there, that they might as well give the climb a go.

Others waited in the shade.

R@SKLs Morib Hanging Out Lee Heng Keng

Photograph courtesy of Lee Heng Keng

Where they were entertained by Meng’s trials with his tire.

R@SKLs Morib Flot Consultants Ong Peng Hong

Photograph courtesy of Ong Peng Hong

Those who rode up to the lighthouses were rewarded with the sweeping views over the Langat River.  And sore legs!

R@SKLs Morib Jugra View

The descent was negotiated with great care.  Rims and brake discs were very hot by this point.

R@SKLs Morib Jugra Descent 1 Hsing C Pai

Photograph courtesy of Hsing C Pai

R@SKLs Morib Jugra Descent 2 Hsing C Pai

Photograph courtesy of Hsing C Pai

R@SKLs Morib Jugra Descent 3 Hsing C Pai

Photograph courtesy of Hsing C Pai

R@SKLs Morib Jugra Descent 4 Hsing C Pai

Photograph courtesy of Hsing C Pai

R@SKLs Morib Jugra Descent 5 Hsing C Pai

Photograph courtesy of Hsing C Pai

R@SKLs Morib Jugra Descent 6 Hsing C Pai

Photograph courtesy of Hsing C Pai

R@SKLs Morib Jugra Descent 7 Hsing C Pai

Photograph courtesy of Hsing C Pai

R@SKLs Morib Jugra Descent 8 Hsing C Pai

Photograph courtesy of Hsing C Pai

R@SKLs Morib Jugra Descent 9 Hsing C Pai

Photograph courtesy of Hsing C Pai

We had about 40km / 25mi left to ride back to Kota Kemuning.  The group stayed together for most of that distance, pedalling at an average of just below 30kph / 18.6mph.

Once we got to Rimbayu, the faster riders pulled ahead, and the group got stretched out over the last 5km / 3mi.  The lone casualty was Kelin, who got lost.  When he called for directions, I hindered rather than helped him.  I misunderstood where he was, and gave him directions that sent him off on a course that took him further from, rather than closer to, Restoran BR Maju.

As is often the case, Daniel came to the rescue.

R@SKLs Bringing Kelin Home Daniel Lim

Photograph courtesy of Daniel Lim

We all enjoyed the ride, the weather (although it was pushing 34°C / 93°F when we finished), and the company.

More importantly, Alfred accomplished his first 100km / 62mi ride.  Congratulations Alfred!  Here is your next challenge.

R@SKLs Morib Jugra Sign Tomoe Suga

Photograph courtesy of Tomoe Suga