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Build an Ark – Or Read Some More

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Some of of my cycling books are about epic rides.  Tim Moore’s book about riding the 2000 Tour de France route for example (see Still Too Wet to Ride?)

Closer to home, Sandra Loh circumnavigated Peninsular Malaysia, together with Mak Shiau Meng, in 2009.  I have a signed copy of Loh’s “Pedalling Around the Peninsula:  A Malaysian Girl’s  Two-Wheeled Adventures.”  Perhaps the most amazing statistic is that she cycled 2,664 km / 1,655mi without a single flat tire.

Pedalling Around

Mark Beaumont took a somewhat longer ride.  And he did it alone.  He cycled 29,446km / 18,297mi to circumnavigate the globe in 194 days in 2008.  That was a  world record at the time.  Achieving it required cycling an average of 160km / 100mi per day, no matter the weather, the terrain or his physical condition.  He did have a few flats along the way, as recounted in “The Man Who Cycled the World.”

The Man Who Cycled

The most tragic ride story is told by David Herlihy in “The Lost Cyclist:  The Epic Tale Of An American Adventurer And His Mysterious Disappearance“.  This is also a story of a man attempting to circumnavigate the globe by bicycle, but in a very different age to Beaumont’s.  Frank Lenz started his ride in 1892, on the then innovative safety bicycle, complete with new-fangled pneumatic tires.  Lenz makes it most of the way around the world before disappearing in eastern Turkey.

The Lost Cyclist

Now onto the books that don’t fall neatly in one classification or another.  Like “Bicycle Love: Stories of Passion, Joy, and Sweat” edited by Garth Battista.  A compilation of 60 or so essays on the many varieties of bicycle love.

Bicycle Love

Another compilation of improbable, silly, crazy and absurd, but all true stories is in “Cycling’s 50 Craziest Stories.”  It is written by Les Woodland, a doyen of British cycling authors with eighteen books on the subject to his name.

Cycling's 50 Craziest

The tell-all book that shook the sport in 2012 was “The Secret Race: Inside the Hidden World of the Tour de France: Doping, Cover-ups and Winning at All Costs” by Tyler Hamilton and his co-author Daniel Coyle.  This book came out as the Lance Armstrong story was coming to a head.  It talks about all the significant doping scandals of the past 15 years with a level of detail not seen before.  The sport of professional cycling will never be the same.

The Secret Race

A book that doesn’t talk about doping but is otherwise an all-one handbook of cycling is “The Complete Bike Book” by Chris Sidwells.  He writes about the history of the bicycle, the essentials of riding, choosing the right equipment and clothing, riding technique, and bike maintenance.  There is something here for beginner and experienced cyclist alike.

The Complete Bike Book

At the other end of the spectrum is a book that does just one thing, and does it very well.  The “Big Blue Book of Bicycle Repair” by Park Tool.  Park Tool makes bike tools, so the company knows a thing or two about bicycle maintenance and repair.  This was the recommended text at the bicycle maintenance course I took.  Enough said.

Park Big Blue

This next item is on the left side of the shelf and sticks up above all the other books.  It is not a book in the traditional sense.  I had to look up what a leporello book is.  “Bicycle,” created for the London 2012 Olympics, is Ugo Gattoni‘s vision of a madcap bicycle race through the streets of London.

Bicycle

The last book in my collection is also a picture book.  Graham Watson is a renowned cycling photographer.  Organized by season, this book takes readers around the globe, from the Australian championships to the Tour de France, always showing the peloton against a backdrop of exquisite, compelling scenery.

Landscapes

Just the thing for a rainy day.

About alchemyrider

I left Malaysia in 2008 as a non-cyclist. I am back home now with two road bikes and all the paraphernalia that goes with being addicted to cycling.

4 responses »

  1. I’m not into competitive cycling. I’ve been a cyclist for transportation, fitness, touring, etc….last 22 yrs. Am car-free. That’s what cycling means..totally embedded in my lifestyle.

    Hence, I love reading good long bike touring travelogues. Dervla Murphy is great and veteran all over the world. She was still cycle-touring overseas. Josie Dew cranked out some good ones.

    By coincidence you’ve listed primarily books for and about male cyclists. Just thought I’ll make the bike tire track note on that.

    Reply
    • Hello Jean,

      Thanks for reading my post and commenting. My lat mother had some Dervla Murphy books. Unfortunately that was before I started cycling (non-competitive too), and her books were gifted to others when she dies.

      I hadn’t noticed the male bias. Apart from Sandra Loh’s book. I’ll look up Josie Dew. I have thought about getting Beryl Burton’s biography. I’ve got to finish reading what I already have first!

      Cheers.

      Reply
  2. There are some very interesting cycling books there – I’m going to have to track down a couple of them. Of course, I need to spend more time riding and less time reading.

    Thanks for sharing.

    Reply

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